Women Call the Shots When It Comes to Banking

As women are taking a larger role in the economy, they require more tailored tools and solutions from their financial institutions. The Future of Financial Services Report indicated Gen Y women are expected to dominate higher education graduation rates and professional workforce entry, taking control of financial responsibility both as household CEOs, consumers and business decision makers fueling the She-conomy. Additionally the report states that by the year 2020, 60 percent of baby boomers will be women, the majority of whom will work beyond the traditional retirement age by starting small businesses and re-entering the workforce.

Women will hold a larger piece of the pie as is substantiated by reports from the CUNA Marketing and Business Development Council, which states that baby boomer women will control two thirds of consumer wealth over the next decade, and the book Women Want More which indicated by 2014 women could earn about $18 trillion a year and control as much as $28 trillion of spending.

With this customer segment growing in importance, financial institutions need to provide tools and solutions to not only balance a checkbook – but balance it all. Intuit Financial Services’ Fourth Annual Financial Management Survey found women have very strong opinions about the ways they like to bank.

Women prioritize online banking for convenient management of their finances:

  • One third of respondents said they would switch financial institutions for one that offers better online banking tools.
  • Women are also smart shoppers; 82 percent would use a service from their bank or credit union that provides discounts on products and services they already use.
  • Women are also high adopters of mobile banking to meet their busy lifestyle with more than one-fifth of women reporting use of their mobile device to access their bank account or use banking tools.
  • Mobile banking also serves as a good retention tool for this customer segment as 16 percent of women surveyed said they would switch financial institutions if theirs stopped offering mobile banking.

Lastly, in a time when consumers are finding their voice to demand the appropriate fees and offerings from their banks, 35 percent of women indicate theyhave already, or plan to switch where they bank due to increased fees.

Are you seeing women driving adoption of mobile or online banking at your financial institution? How do you see women shaping your financial management offerings? Let us know in the comments section below, or Tweet @bankingdotcom.