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/   Insights

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/   Spotlight

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Fast Facts: Student Loans

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/   Insights

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/   Insights

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/   Insights

In the most recent election cycle, like most others before it, the one sector of the economy that got the most attention was small business.  This is the future, we were told by every...

The Top 10 Trends in the Digital Banking Industry

December 18, 2013
/   Spotlight

2014 is rapidly approaching and as the year wraps, the Digital Insight team has pulled together the top 10 trends in the digital banking industry based on data and trends from studying financial institutions....

Mobile Banking Engagement: Data from Digital Insight

June 24, 2013
/   Spotlight

Intuit Financial Services has been conducting a comprehensive and ongoing study of financial institution customers. From these studies, the company has been able to provide a deeper view of banking customer behavior across several...

Fast Facts: Financial Executive Economic Outlook Report

February 1, 2013
/   Insights

The Financial Services Roundtable recently released another iteration of it’s Fast Facts, reliable, bullet-point research about issues facing the financial services industry. This series is the The Financial Services Roundtable’s first bi-annual Financial Executive Economic Outlook...

Tracking the adoption of mobile banking is like putting human behavior under a microscope…again. In a sense, it’s very much like the adoption of online banking (or online anything else), only on a much faster scale. To some, it’s still odd working with professionals who can’t remember what business was like before the Internet. Imagine how we’ll feel when the colleague in the next cubicle has no memory of life before “there’s an app for that.”

The issue seems to have taken on extra relevance because there’s been a flurry of articles recently about how mobile banking is not being adopted as widely as it should because of security concerns. Even the Better Business Bureau (BBB) is offering tips on safe mobile banking practices.

There’s nothing wrong with good, sensible advice, but maybe we need some perspective here.

First, let’s be clear about the adoption of mobile banking: It’s growing at an astonishing rate. As far back as 2011, an eternity in tech years, research firm Yankee Group projected in its Mobile Money Forecast that global mobile transactions would grow from $241 billion last year to $1 trillion-plus by 2015. That’s a staggering CAGR (compound annual growth rate) of 56%–how many other trends can we say that about?

More to the point, the practice continues to grow without huge amounts of education or even promotion. Just a few years ago, the term ‘mobile app’ didn’t even exist; now there are literally millions of them, and most of us are blasé about what we choose to download and use on a regular basis. The mobile device has effectively blurred the distinction between personal and business use and forced our employers to keep up rather than push us to try new software.

Sure, putting money into the mix changes things. It’s one thing to download a video game for playing while on the road and entirely another to use a new button to make an impulse investment or just transfer funds. But what’s remarkable is not how few people do exactly this and more, it’s how many do it every day.

Again, good advice is always welcome, but it’s likely that most of have already heard (perhaps many times over) what the BBB is telling us we should do to protect out investments. Don’t follow links; don’t download authorized applications; keep devices secure. That said, we probably need to keep hearing it.

It used to be said that while Windows PCs got hacked relentlessly, Macintoshes were pretty safe. That’s statistically accurate, and therefore true, but one reason is that the customer base for Apple products was comparatively small. Hackers went after Windows users for the same reason that Willie Sutton allegedly gave for robbing banks: that’s where the money is. Well, guess where the money is now.

There will always be some, from the hyper-cautious to the Luddites, who resist mobile banking. The alternate reality is that there’s already a vast customer base for mobile banking, and they deserve the greatest attention (which is exactly what cyber-criminals are giving them).

The mobile experience for every human action will continue to evolve and gain in popularity, and banking is no exception. There will be viruses and data breaches, and a few will gain enough of a profile to scare off some potential users. But the technology itself offers too much flexibility, productivity and convenience to completely outweigh the risks.

There’s a downside, and we need to keep it in mind. But as industry professionals, it’s our job not to be overwhelmed by the threats but instead focus on keeping the practice as secure as possible. Our customers—and there are many of them—need that.

This article originally appeared as a guest post on MyBankTracker.com.

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James W. Gabberty

Gabberty is a professor of information systems at Pace University in New York City. An alumnus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and New York University Polytechnic Institute, he has served as an expert witness in telecommunication and information security at the federal and state levels and holds numerous certifications from SANS & ISACA.

Marisa Mann

Marisa Mann brings over 15 years of experience in consulting and financial services industries to the Solstice team, working on large scale enterprise initiatives across many technologies, including specializing in the digital space – Internet and mobile. Mann is passionate about mobile and the endless possibilities for the enterprise, delivering business value through strong brand recognition and driving to excellence in the consumer experience. Prior to Solstice, Mann worked at JP Morgan Chase, Diamond Management and Technology Consultants, Washington Mutual, Inc, and Accenture.

Zachary Ehrlich

25-year-old writer, and as a native San Franciscan, I am unreasonably loyal to Bank of America, if only for their superhero-like origin story, involving the 1906 earthquake and Italian fruit vendors.

Brad Strothkamp

http://www.forrester.com/rb/analyst/brad_strothkamp