Community Service with the Personal Touch

September 23, 2014
/   Insights

Question: Community branch, personal service, mobile banking—which is the odd one out? Answer: None. Otherwise, the industry is in trouble. For some time now, there have been discussions about the future of community banks...

Cause and Effect: If you build it, will they come?

July 23, 2014
/   Spotlight

Many financial institutions assume that digital banking is lucrative because the most valuable customers happen to bank online. While there is certainly a correlation between online bankers and higher profitability, quantitative evidence suggests that...

Fast Facts: Student Loans

January 22, 2013
/   Insights

The Financial Services Roundtable recently released another iteration of its Fast Facts, reliable, bullet-point research about issues facing the financial services industry. Topics span TARP, Dodd-Frank, insurance, lending, retirement savings and more.  Below are some updated Fast...

Intuit 2020 Report: The Future of Financial Services

April 11, 2011
/   Insights

Today, Intuit released the latest edition of the Intuit 2020 report, Intuit 2020 Report: The Future of Financial Services, which identifies and examines four key trend areas that will  transform the financial services industry...

The Top 10 Trends in the Digital Banking Industry

December 18, 2013
/   Spotlight

2014 is rapidly approaching and as the year wraps, the Digital Insight team has pulled together the top 10 trends in the digital banking industry based on data and trends from studying financial institutions....

Small Business: Perception vs. Reality

November 21, 2012
/   Insights

In the most recent election cycle, like most others before it, the one sector of the economy that got the most attention was small business.  This is the future, we were told by every...

Mobile Banking Engagement: Data from Digital Insight

June 24, 2013
/   Spotlight

Intuit Financial Services has been conducting a comprehensive and ongoing study of financial institution customers. From these studies, the company has been able to provide a deeper view of banking customer behavior across several...

Fast Facts: Financial Executive Economic Outlook Report

February 1, 2013
/   Insights

The Financial Services Roundtable recently released another iteration of it’s Fast Facts, reliable, bullet-point research about issues facing the financial services industry. This series is the The Financial Services Roundtable’s first bi-annual Financial Executive Economic Outlook...

In recent weeks Office Depot and Google announced credit programs aimed at small businesses. Office Depot is partnering with Superior Financial Group, a non-bank SBA lending company, to offer small business loans up to $25,000.

Google is offering small businesses a credit card that can only be used to pay for AdWords, Google’s keyword advertising program. Google’s credit card offers a very competitive interest rate and no annual fees.

These companies join another corporate giant – Wal-Mart – in providing credit services to small businesses. Wal-Mart, also in partnership with Superior Financial Group, started offering small business loans last year.

These firms illustrate a broader trend of nontraditional competitors targeting the financial services industry. These new competitors include some the world’s largest corporations and best-funded, venture-backed startups. They are hoping to use disruptive innovation based on both new technology and the shift to online banking to attract customers and gain share in the financial services industry.

Disruptive innovation is a term coined by Harvard Business School professor Clayton Christensen. It describes a process by which a product or service creates a new market or reshapes an existing market by delivering simple, low-cost innovations to a set of customers who are ignored or underserved by industry leaders.

Industry leaders ignore these customers because they aren’t viewed as important enough, or profitable enough, to pursue. After a disruptive competitor establishes themselves with this group, these firms often move up-market, eventually challenging traditional competitors for their best and most profitable customers.

The classic example of disruptive innovation is Southwest Airlines. Southwest initially targeted price sensitive vacation travelers, a segment considered unattractive by the airline industry. Ignored by larger rivals, Southwest moved up-market and over time firmly established itself with business travelers, the airline industry’s most coveted customers.

We think something similar may be happening in the small business credit space.

The customers targeted by Wal-Mart, Office Depot, Google and others are very small businesses, most with less than $1 million in revenue -  a segment seen as unattractive by many financial institutions. But by ignoring this segment, financial institutions are providing an entry point for new competitors who may leverage this beachhead to become significant players in the financial services industry.

 

About Steve King:  Steve is a Partner at Emergent Research. His current research and consulting is focused on economic decentralization, the growth of small business and the future of work and workplaces. Steve has extensive consulting, marketing and general management experience with both large and small companies.  Steve is a senior fellow and board member at the Society For New Communications Research, a research affiliate at the Future of Work and an advisory board member at Pond Ventures.

About Carolyn Ockels:  Carolyn is the Managing Partner at Emergent Research.  Her current research and consulting is focused on economic decentralization, the growth of small business and Gen Y.  Carolyn has extensive consulting experience, and prior to Emergent Research managed Cambridge Energy Research’s Asian energy consulting business, led market research in Japan for RCM Capital Managment, and held a variety of domestic and international consulting positions with the economic forecasting and planning consulting firm Data Resources, Inc.

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Voices

Compelling voices and contributed content from around the web

James W. Gabberty

Gabberty is a professor of information systems at Pace University in New York City. An alumnus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and New York University Polytechnic Institute, he has served as an expert witness in telecommunication and information security at the federal and state levels and holds numerous certifications from SANS & ISACA.

Brad Strothkamp

http://www.forrester.com/rb/analyst/brad_strothkamp

Marisa Mann

Marisa Mann brings over 15 years of experience in consulting and financial services industries to the Solstice team, working on large scale enterprise initiatives across many technologies, including specializing in the digital space – Internet and mobile. Mann is passionate about mobile and the endless possibilities for the enterprise, delivering business value through strong brand recognition and driving to excellence in the consumer experience. Prior to Solstice, Mann worked at JP Morgan Chase, Diamond Management and Technology Consultants, Washington Mutual, Inc, and Accenture.

Zachary Ehrlich

25-year-old writer, and as a native San Franciscan, I am unreasonably loyal to Bank of America, if only for their superhero-like origin story, involving the 1906 earthquake and Italian fruit vendors.