What We’re Reading: Cloud Computing, Lending and Device Strategies

Below are interesting stories the Banking.com staff has been reading over the past week. What have you been reading? Let us know in the comments section below or Tweet @bankingdotcom.

 

  • Asked About Digital Wallets, Most Consumers Only Know of PayPal: Study

American Banker

The promise of digital wallets has fueled the conversations and hopes of financial technologists for years. But there are many obstacles to having those dreams realized, including the fact that few consumers know that digital wallets exist. Only 51% of U.S. consumers said they are aware of wallets other than PayPal, according to a comScore Inc. study published this week. comScore defines digital wallets as virtual copy of the contents of a consumer’s physical wallet to facilitate online or offline retail.

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  • Big Banks Boost Lending to Small Businesses: Survey

American Banker

Big banks are showing a growing appetite for loans to small businesses. Banks with at least $10 billion in assets approved 15.3% of loans between $25,000 and $3 million in January, up from 14.9% in December and from 11.7% a year earlier, according to an index published Thursday by Biz2Credit, which connects small and mid-size business borrowers with lenders.

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  • Cloud Computing Security Rules Put Responsibility on Users

American Banker

The PCI Security Standards Council has published guidelines for protecting sensitive data in the cloud. Although the advice was written to protect card information, the same principles could be applied to any data stored remotely. The report states that installing and maintaining a firewall to protect cardholder data would be a shared responsibility between client and provider under infrastructure-as-a-service and platform-as-a-service cloud configurations. But for software-as-a-service, in which the cloud provider hosts software delivered over the web, the firewall would be the sole responsibility of the provider, the PCI Council has decided.

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  • Understanding the Tablet Banking Customer

BAI Banking Strategies

Tablet usage is growing exponentially, with important implications for retail banking. According to eMarketer, the number of U.S. tablet users was expected to reach nearly 70 million by the end of 2012, up from 34 million in 2011. Adoption is now strong enough to provide an accurate assessment of this user segment and develop a strategy for engaging these consumers in financial services.

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  • Five Things Every Business Leader Should Know About Social Capital and the Influence Economy

Business 2 Community

Though social capital is an intangible, it reflects on how well you’re known, liked and trusted. Social capital can be most simply understood as the good reputation and influence of your business or personal brand. Like the concept of goodwill in business valuation, social capital is an intangible whose value is determined by others. “A brand is no longer what we tell the consumer it is – it is what consumers tell each other it is.” ~ Scott Cook, Intuit

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  • Why You Need To Have A ‘Device Strategy’

Credit Union Journal

A recent study by First Data showed that 61% of Americans use a smartphone and that 56% of smartphone users use their smartphone to bank. Plus, almost one-third say they expect a mobile phone app from their FI. Most respondents go online to bank (86%) and pay bills (81%) frequently. Yet, while web-based transaction services are now the benchmark, ATMs still play an important role in consumer transactions. Although consumers view ATMs traditionally-as devices that enable them to retrieve cash, deposit checks, and monitor account balances-there are new capabilities that enhance individualized communications to promote both cross-selling and customer loyalty.

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  • Now banks have to worry about Apple and Google

St. Louis Business Journal

Financial institutions aren’t keeping up with the customers’ needs and desires in mobile banking, according to a recent survey.  Varollii, a Seattle technology company, found that increasingly tech savvy customers want more than what many banks are giving them and that they’re finding it from providers such as Apple and Google, which are offering competitive consumer-friendly services, such as personal financial management and alerts, The Street reports.
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  • Mobile Banking and Change is Coming

SYS-CON Media

In the book Bank 3.0 by Brett King he writes about the monumental changes taking place in the banking industry due first to the Internet and now mobile.  Here is an excerpt, “The average individual is spending 94 minutes or so a day using apps, checking emails and texting up to 100 times per day.  We’re logging on to mobile banking 20-30 times per month and Internet banking around 7-10 times per month, but visiting a branch (of a bank) only a few times a year.”

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  • Big Banks Bet on Mobility and Super-Powered ATMs

WSJ: CIO Journal

As big banks finish the job of consolidating IT systems and knocking down organizational silos, they are counting on investments in mobile applications for both retail and commercial customers, and more sophisticated ATMs, to increase customer satisfaction, lower transaction costs, and help improve margins and revenue growth. According to PNC Financial Services Group, the average cost of a transaction using an online or mobile device is 56 cents, and 59 cents at an ATM, compared with $3.97 when a customer transacts with a bank teller.

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Small Business Lending to Finally See Improvement in 2011?

If you asked small business owners 18 months ago how challenging it was to secure a loan through a financial institution, a majority would respond it was nearly impossible. However, those sentiments are starting to change.

A recent National Federation of Independent Businesses survey found that the total number of small business respondents who said they faced challenges with their financial institution in obtaining loans was the lowest since September 2008.  Some in the industry see this as a small win, while others feel there is still a long road ahead before small business lending is back to usual. Financial institutions have made great strides to get to this point, by addressing challenges in the market to better serve their small business customers and create a lending environment they can trust.

For as long as one can remember, lending has largely been the basis of a relationship established between a financial institution and small business owner. In 2011, it will be no different, continuing to be a barometer for successful relations between the two parties. But, it will also open doors of new opportunities for financial institutions to become more strategic partners in the success of small businesses.

What are you seeing in your local markets when it comes to small business lending? Let us know by leaving a comment below.