Regulation and Resolution: The Future of Banking?

Banker signing paper

From this side of the Atlantic, the European Union (EU) can seem like a weird thing—most of us aren’t exactly sure when it started, how far it stretches or even what it exactly is. What we do know is that it’s a case study in constant evolution: It dates back to at least the ’50s, when six nations formed the European Coal and Steel Community and, later, the European Economic Community. However, the current European Union actually takes its name and primary structure from the Maastricht Treaty of 1993. The monetary union, the source of the Euro, was born in 1999; the constitutional basis for the EU, the Treaty of Lisbon, arrived 10 years later; and countries are still joining (Croatia became a member only last year).

Of course, as a unified entity, the EU still seems a little bit strange. But the potential for superpower status is clearly there, which may be one reason why it was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2012.

And then we get to March 2014. That’s when, after protracted negotiations, the last piece of the puzzle fell into place for an all-purpose European banking authority that will, at least by design, be better equipped to handle industry crashes, especially the kind that might have a domino effect. Most importantly, the entity has the regulatory authority to restructure, sell off or even shut down failing banks.

The move is a direct response to recent disasters that had catastrophic consequences for many institutions. Even entire nations have been similarly affected, most famously when a series bank failures and attempted bailouts virtually bankrupted Ireland and sparked major scandals. And whenever this happened, of course, other organizations and governments had to step into the breach, forcing taxpayers in one country to pay for the mistakes of financial services corporations in others.


To its credit, the new entity is designed to look forward rather than just back. The European Central Bank (ECB) has already been doing due diligence on larger financial services institutions to look for potential minefields. It won’t be a huge surprise if it does find problems. Meanwhile, the Resolution Board, as it’s called, has a two-pronged mandate.

First, it takes the power of supervision away from local regulators, who might be too close to the corporations they’re supposed to be monitoring. (They might also turn a blind eye to avoid making national institutions look bad.)  More important, perhaps, is the other function, which entails setting up a fund that is empowered to take essentially unilateral action on lenders that are deemed to be in trouble. In these instances, the fund can order a restructuring, sale or even shutdown (in some cases there will be other steps necessary). The fund will have in its coffers $76 billion to conduct these rescues as needed, with the money to be raised through levies on the industry.

The intent, of course, is to protect taxpayers from having to foot the bill for bad decisions made by bank executives. It should also help send a message of stability to financial markets everywhere. These are laudable goals, surely, but will it work?

To be clear, the Resolution Board doesn’t even exist yet. It won’t launch until next year, and contributions to the fund will start the year after that. There are also objections being raised to the effect that the agreement doesn’t go far enough. Some argue that in order to be truly effective, the new entity should be completely independent, rather than tied to an industry authority like the ECB, which has its own connections to national interests. But for those who want strong regulation, it’s clearly a start.

That brings us back to these shores. As we all remember from recent history, the United States has had its share of crashing banks, taxpayer-funded bailouts and accusations of lax regulation. Is there anything for us to learn from what the European Union is doing?

 

The Klout-Influenced Credit Score Would Give Credit Where It Isn’t Due

*This post originally appeared on MyBankTracker

If you’re an insufferable person who speaks on social media panels with any degree of regularity, you’re probably more aware of what your Klout score is than you are your credit score. After all, you can check your Klout score all day — you can only check your credit score once a year from each bureau. Who has the time? You live an active social media lifestyle, and retweets probably matter more to you than your mortgage rate. You are pretty terrible. Well we’ve got good news for you: at Movenbank, your social media influence might soon influence your credit score — a terrifying thought!

Movenbank, a soon-to-launch financial services company, launched something called the CREDscore in private alpha. It is comprised of a number of different factors: your actual credit score, your personality and, yes, your social media influence. Strange as it sounds, Movenbank might actually make business decisions based on your Klout — or something a lot like it.

First, Movenbank puts you through a financial personality quiz to better understand your relationship with money. You’re assigned a “type”: salesperson, professor, accountant, rockstar, entrepreneur, officer, artist (wouldn’t want to get that one!), breadwinner or trader. For now, this is just filler, but it might factor into your score in the future.

The CREDscore also takes into account actually important financial information like annual income, how much you save per month, how much you have saved up, and your FICO score. So there is hard data factored into the score.

But users can also connect their Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Google Plus accounts to give Movenbank a better sense of your social media influence. The company explains why in a blog post that describes different credit profiles that a CREDscore could benefit. Here’s Ashley, someone who has fallen on hard times, but has a lot of LinkedIn contacts:

Then there’s Ashley. Ashley’s a bit older than Matt and Jessica, but he lost his job a few years ago. Then he lost his house. Ashley’s suffering. The bank foreclosed and now he can’t get any opportunity to get new things started.

But he has an idea. He wants to launch a new business that makes funky trainers that tweet and check-in on foursquare as you run.

Sounds stupid, but don’t be fooled. According to LinkedIn, Ashley has a heavy influence on some potential investors who are sniffing around the ‘Tweener,’ as he calls it. The only thing is he has a problem. The mainstream financial service providers don’t want to know him.

Here at Movenbank though, we love Ashley.

We love Ashley because we can see he’s on the cusp of a breakthrough. But we can’t just give Ashley all the things he wants, so we offer him a deposit account and a limited loan facility to get the business started. The loan facility increases over time, as his Klout increases.

One reason why underwriters typically rely on hard data when assessing credit risk, is because dangling lots of money in front of people who need it desperately can often make them less than honest. Low-documentation and no-documentation loans are called “liar loans” for very good reason: if you’re self-reporting income to qualify for a mortgage, it’s easy to fudge it upward a bit, especially when your mortgage broker encourages you to. Despite what Movenbank would like to think, it’s very easy to fake social media influence — it’s just a pathetic and humiliating experience most of us would readily avoid. Unless we really wanted a loan from Movenbank, perhaps.

This sort of thinking only makes sense if you’re constantly surrounded by tech entrepreneurs all day, as they network and jockey for money and influence. Most of us never need business loans for shoes that integrate with social media. Our financial needs are personal: saving for our first home, retirement, our kids’ education, a vacation, whatever.

But in its defense, CREDscore addresses these issues, too. A higher CREDscore might mean better terms for customers on their accounts: higher savings rates, lower borrowing costs, or lower fees. Strangely, the range is not yet public; those who have been given CREDscores have not been told whether it is good, bad, mediocre, anything. Just: here’s a number, it might mean something later.

Movenbank will launch to the public later this year. And people with parody Twitter accounts might get a better rate on their savings account than you do. It’s strange, because one might reasonably suspect that introverts might have better financial habits than people who tweet every thought or joke that pops into their head. Being impulsive online is different from being impulsive at Macy’s, sure, but being freed of the rigors of a social life would likely cut 40% of the spending out of my monthly budget.

Klout is likely as good a measure of creditworthiness as waistline. Sure, I can infer a lot of lifestyle differences between the man with the 44 inch waist and the man with the 30 inch waist, but just because one probably spends more of his income on cheeseburgers, it doesn’t really tell me how likely he is to pay back a loan — and it definitely doesn’t mean he’s worthy of lower fees or higher savings rates, or vice versa.

But the CREDscore is still in its testing phase. It’s quite possible that none of this will come to pass. So you can stop spamming LinkedIn VC groups — you might end up burning bridges.

About Willy Staley:  Willy is a 25-year-old writer, and as a native San Franciscan, he is unreasonably loyal to Bank of America, if only for their superhero-like origin story, involving the 1906 earthquake and Italian fruit vendors.

Mobile Transactions: Playing with Numbers

Could it be that the only numbers growing faster than mobile transactions are statistics about mobile transactions?

According to a new one just out from ABI Research, mobile shopping will make up nearly a quarter of all global online shopping revenue by the end of 2017. That’s great news for companies invested in this arena, since it clearly represents a sharp spike over the current market, which other estimates place at 10%. However, the same source indicated back in February 2010 that mobile shopping would reach $119 billion in 2015, representing about 8% of the overall e-commerce market.

That’s obviously comparing apples to oranges, but the larger problem is that it’s virtually impossible to accurately predict what’s going to happen with regard to technology use. Technological capabilities are always advancing, and user habits are constantly evolving, but the two phenomena frequently seem unrelated. The emergence of new capabilities does drive usage, of course, just as human needs drive the development of those capabilities, but they seldom happen in tandem. The flood of statistics that keep changing illustrates this problem.

In particular, the intersection of money, technological capabilities and behavioral change make for a strange brew. This is the very essence of a moving target.

Consider mobile payments. Portio Research told us back in March 2010 that 81.3 million people worldwide had used mobile device to make payments the previous year. By the end of 2014, this was predicted to rise to nearly 490 million, or 8% of all mobile subscribers. In June 2011, Yankee Group was putting dollar signs into the mix, reporting that global mobile transactions would reach $241 billion in 2011, and jump to more than $1 trillion by 2015. Fast forward another year, and Gartner was reporting that the number for worldwide mobile payment transaction values in 2011 had been $105.9 billion, and will surpass $171.5 billion in 2012. Bringing it back to users, meanwhile, Gartner said there had been 160.5 million in 2011, and is set to jump to 212.2 million this year.

One more demonstration of how the numbers stack up, even if they don’t add up: Yankee Group identified EMEA as the mobile money hot spot, accounting for 41% of mobile transaction value in 2011, compared to 35% for North America, 22% percent in Asia-Pacific and just 1% percent in Latin America. Others saw it differently: According to IDTechEx (R&M), Feb 2011, Japan had 47 million users adopting tap-and-go phones in just three years, and at the very same time, ComScore was revealing that that in December 2010 alone, 10% of Japanese mobile subscribers had used their mobile wallet to make a purchase—a undeniably a high number.

And how about mobile banking? Try this: In the spring of 2010, Global Industry Analysts (GIA) predicted that the global customer base for mobile banking will reach 1.1 billion by the year 2015, while Berg Insight put the corresponding number at 894 million users. In the summer of 2011, Yankee Group brought the figure down further, to 500 million.

Enough already? For sure. In fact—and again, let’s acknowledge that all this involves mixing apples and oranges and a whole lot besides—it may be time for a moratorium on analyses and predictions. Instead, let’s focus more on what we can do to drive the market rather than track where it’s going.

Smartphones, tablets and other mobile devices still coming down the pike are not just smaller PCs—they represent, and drive, a sea change in behavior. It’s our responsibility to offer applications and services that are flexible, convenient, customized and secure. And the only numbers that count are the ones where we beat even the most optimistic projections.

This article originally appeared as a guest post on MyBankTracker.com.

10 Resolutions Bank Marketers Can’t Ignore in 2012

*This blog was originally posted on Bank Marketing Strategy by Jim Marous. Jim is a marketing services leader focused on building strategic solutions for the financial services industry. You can follow him on Twitter @JimMarous or connect on LinkedIn.

2011 was year that many bankers, and especially bank marketers would love to forget. Not only was focus diverted by the need to respond to new regulations for the second consecutive year (this time it was the Durbin Amendment), but the image of our entire industry was challenged as foreclosures and bank failures continued to be in the news.

We didn’t do ourselves any favors in 2011 either, as some of the larger banks learned the power of social media when they decided to increase (and then rescind) debit card fees, or when the industry fought internally with Bank Transfer Day.

The biggest impact of all of this noise was that attention was diverted from what should have been accomplished in 2011. As I reviewed my post from last year, Ten Bank Marketer Resolutions for 2011, it is clear that most bank marketers lacked the time/focus to make much progress on any of last year’s goals. So, in writing this year’s Bank Marketer Resolution post, I could have simply posted the same resolutions from last year (similar to what I do with some of my personal resolutions). Instead, I reached out to bank industry leaders from across the globe for their ideas. There was surprising uniformity in their suggestions, and a sense of urgency around the need to achieve much more than last year.

So here are the resolutions bank marketers should not ignore in 2012 according to industry leaders:

1. Validate The Value of Marketing Through Measurement: As highlighted in my recent post 100 Years Later, Marketers Still Have Difficulty Measuring Up, there is still a tremendous gap between what bank marketers implement and what is measured. Not only are there almost 20% of marketers who don’t find measurement of results imperative according to recent research by Ifbyphone, but less that 50% of any channel is measured. Dan Marks from First Tennessee says, “Bank marketers should resolve to measure and optimize true marketing ROI – having the courage to seek out the unproductive part of the marketing mix and replace it with other activities that generate real shareholder returns.” Serge Milman, CEO of Optirate states, “In 2012, bank marketers should resolve to have a more diligent focus placed on business drivers that can help manage and grow the bank,” while Bradley Leimer, vice president of online/mobile strategy at Mechanics Bank said that,  “The number one resolution for bank marketers in 2012 must be to ‘put data first,’ since the proof of any program resides in the measurement of results.”

Jeffry Pilcher from The Financial Brand added a common sense resolution that is not always followed . . . “stop doing things that don’t work.” It is clear that if only one resolution can be accomplished in 2012, the measurement of attribution and program results is the most important.
2. Don’t Confuse Channel Economy with Channel Effectiveness: One of my resolutions from last year that needs reinforcement is that bank marketers should leverage the measurement mentioned above to ensure that the right channel (and mix of channels) are used for the right customers. While social and digital media seems less expensive, it doesn’t work as well on its own as it does when mixed with traditional channels. In fact, recent research discussed on this blog has shown that for financial services, many of the traditional channels are more desired and effective than new media. In addition, many bank customers are not reached at all with phone, email or social media programs. As mentioned above, 2012 should be the year of improved measurement and improved attribution analysis, which will help to answer the questions around which channels should be used.

3. Be Customer-Centric: Ron Shevlin, senior analyst from Aite Group and author of the book and blog Snarketing 2.0 stated in a recent post, “banks need to be perceived as doing what’s right for their customers and not just their own bottom line.” One of the banks I work with stated it best when they said that customer centricity means:

    • Know who the customer is and what they want
    • Look out for the customer and help them make the right decisions
    • Reward the customer for their patronage with tangible and intangible benefits

Saying you’re customer-centric is not enough, though. “When claiming your bank is customer-centric, actions speak louder than words,” warned Elizabeth Lumley, special projects editor at Finextra. This was especially evident in 2011, when many large banks made fee changes that created an uproar in social media, resulting in reversals of those decisions. To this new phenomenon, Chris Skinner, author of the Financial Services Club Blog suggested, “Bank marketers should resolve to make 2012 the year where good communication and real transparency ensures that we don’t get screwed by social media campaigns.”

4. Build a Social Media Strategy That Compliments Your Overall Marketing Plan: Instead of engaging in social media because other industries are doing so, it is time to treat social media like other channels, with defined goals, strategies and expected ROI outcomes. “While simply having a Facebook page or Twitter account may have been sufficient in the past, customers are expected to utilize these channels to connect with their bank even more in 2012,” says Karen Licker, financial consultant and social banker (independent) for J.D. Power and Associates. “Given the public nature of these contacts, bank marketers should have a resolution to be aware of these conversations and direct customer outreach, and be equipped to respond quickly to questions or issues raided via these channels.”

Nicole Sturgill, research director for delivery channels at TowerGroup, suggested that bank marketers should resolve to engaging the front line in social media since many don’t realize they are being talked about. Alex Bray, managing consultant at IBM recommended, “Bank marketers should create a clear vision for social media based on a genuine customer value proposition while killing vanity projects that don’t add value.” Added John Owens “In 2012, bankers will need to understand the role and importance of social media to better serve clients and receive feedback.”

5. Leverage Big Data for Better Conversations: There is a lot of discussion in the marketplace about the use of ‘big data’ to transform customer communication and the customer experience. There are very few places where more customer insight is available than in the financial services industry, where we not only have access to demographic and financial service ownership data, but also transactional insight that gives us a view into financial and purchase behaviors. But big data is nothing new, and should not be overwhelming in an environment where the ability to process data has also grown exponentially.

Unfortunately, as was found by Ron Shevlin from Aite Group earlier this year and in a soon to be published report, bank marketers are still not very comfortable with communicating online or through mobile channels using available insights. This may require new talents and new teams according to Brett King, founder of Movenbank, and author of the best-selling book and blog Bank 2.0. “In 2012, bank marketers should have a resolution to build a team that can create compelling customer journeys in real-time,” states King. “Marketing is no longer about ‘pushing’ messages,” continues King. Fred Hagerman, CMO of Firstmark Credit Union adds, “Bank marketers should have a resolution to combine web analytics and database knowledge to drive even more relevant communication.”

6. Build Customer Value From Day 1: While there has been a great deal of discussion around the cost of a checking account since the December 9 American Banker article on the subject, there is no disputing the fact that fees alone can’t make a relationship profitable. As a result, it is imperative that bank marketers look at customers as valuable assets to the bank that need to be nurtured and grown through increased engagement, relationship expansion and retention. As stated by Matthew Wilcox from Zions Bank, “2012 is a year when all bank marketers should resolve to have multichannel new customer onboarding programs as well as highly targeted relationship growth initiatives. To not have these programs in place would leave valuable money on the table and risk losing potentially valuable relationships.”

7. Build Bank Value Daily: The past few years have been difficult for our industry, with the faith and confidence in many leading financial organizations being shaken. In 2012, consumers will look for solid value in products and services with every purchase and decision they make. Those organizations that don’t reinforce the value they provide – every day – will be challenged. Dan Marks said that bank marketers should resolve to “refine, renew, and reinforce the bank’s key brand distinction across the entire enterprise – everyone should know and exhibit how the bank uniquely serves customers’ needs.” Steve Cocheo from the ABA Banking Journal suggested a rather straight forward resolution, “Bank marketers need to accentuate trust and value in the communications they develop and strategies they build.” Bank consultant, Lori Philo-Cook seconded this resolution when she recommended, “Bank marketers should resolve to find new ways to communicate with customers in order to rebuild trust and strengthen relationships.”

8. Innovate: Plain and simple, 2012 is a year where bank marketers should try new things and support innovation done in other areas of the bank. Bryan Clagett, CMO and investor at software services provider Geezeo put it best with his recommended resolution, “Bank marketers should not be afraid to experiment and think outside the box in 2012.” For those organizations where budget, philosophy or other variables may make true innovation challenging, payments pro Scott Loftesness provides a suggestion, “Bank marketers should prepare to be a fast follower, especially in mobile for 2012, unless they have the budget to be an innovator.”

9. Focus on Personal and Professional Development: While the skills needed to do effective bank marketing remain pretty much the same (targeting, messaging, measuring, etc.), the channels available have definitely increased. Therefore, bank marketers can no longer rest on their laurels and hope to succeed in the new marketing environment. More than ever, there needs to be a dedication to becoming familiar with the changes in the marketplace from a product and channel perspective. As stated by bank consultant Jeff Marsico, “The goal for bank marketers is to earn a place at their bank’s strategic planning table and to be more than just an ad budget.” Being aware of the changes in the marketplace can help earn this respect.

For me, I find that following industry leaders on Twitter and subscribing to industry blogs (like mine) are a great way to keep up to speed. Throughout this post, I have provided links to some of the industry pundits who share valuable insights and research on Twitter. Following them will go a long way towards keeping you in the loop. Watching who they follow will further expand your depth and breadth of knowledge. Bob Williams from Harland Clarke put it well in his suggested resolution, “Bank marketers should resolve to listen, discuss, think, read, and write. In short, they should be part of the conversation.” Community banker David Gerbino provided a more basic, yet important resolution that, “Bank marketers need to resolve that they will understand finance, financial reports, and know how to calculate product profitability.”

10. Don’t Be Afraid to Break From The Herd: The banking industry is notorious for having a ‘herd mentality’, following each other’s lead as opposed to thinking independently. In the past, the logic for doing this was usually based around risk aversion. Today, following other bank’s can be both risky and can inhibit value creative. Look at the events around the raising of debit card fees by Bank of America, where many large banks followed the strategy of Bank of America only to have to follow the bank again as they rescinded the fee. The same can be said for the jumping into the social media waters without a defined strategy. While almost all banks are doing something in social media, very few can define the value it is bringing to their bank or what the ROI on this investment is.

2012 should be the year of breakout opportunity for those bank marketers who want to embrace the challenges associated with change. It is definitely not ‘banking as usual’, but is the environment where market leadership is gained and disruption creates new business models and customer segments.

I doubt if any bank marketer will succeed at all of the above resolutions. There may even be better resolutions than the industry experts provided above. If you have one that we missed, let me know. If you think some of the resolutions above are not valid, let me know as well.

I look forward to your comments and to a very exciting 2012.

Leave us a comment below, or Tweet at the author @JimMarous.

What Will 2012 Bring for the Banking Industry?

As we wrap up 2011 and head into the New Year, we asked some of our readers to share their thoughts on the banking industry in 2012. This past year has been filled with mobile and tablet innovation, but will that carry on in 2012? How will social media impact financial institutions in the next year? Here’s what the experts are saying:

  • “Of those banks that are currently using social media as a channel to communicate with their customers, much of the focus has been on appealing to Gen X and Gen Y customers,” says Karen Licker, Financial Consultant & Social Banker (Independent) for J.D. Power and Associates. “Clearly Gen X and Gen Y customers comprise the majority of those subscribing to and using social media, but the number of Pre-Boomers and Boomers who do so as well is growing at a considerable rate.  In addition, Based on J.D. Power’s 2011 Retail Satisfaction Survey, nearly one in five Gen X and Gen Y customers state that they are likely to utilize social media for banking-related topics in the future, and more than one in 10 Pre-Boomer and Boomer customers are likely to do the same.  Banks should be prepared to interact with and satisfy the growing Pre-Boomer and Boomer customers too!” *see Chart 1 below
  • “2012 will finally see the tipping point for mobile banking. Mobile moves beyond today’s limited functionality and starts to become the primary remote customer channel. Look for some interesting corporate bedfellows to emerge as the financial services ecosystem starts validating mobile payment business models and the importance of controlling new methods of money transfers and payments. We will see continued disruption in the space, as it relates to payments, security protocols, features like proximity rewards, integrated p2p and a2a with social tether, account opening, and more. Expect feature rich device agnostic applications that enhance usability and user experience across a range of mobile and tablet devices.” Bradley G. Leimer, Vice President, Online and Mobile Strategy at Mechanics Bank (@leimer)
  • “2012 will be the year of improved customer lifecycle management. With the fees and interest margins associated with accounts falling, there is a need to acquire a new customer more efficiently, onboard each new customer more effectively, achieve a higher level of relationship engagement and gain a greater share of wallet. Financial organizations will also need to focus more resources on retaining current clients since replacing these households has become so expensive.”  Jim Marous, Senior Director, Marketing Services, Harland Clarke (@JimMarous)
  • “In the credit card space, service alerts have steadily grown in importance over the last few years,” says Michael Beird, Director of Banking Services for J.D. Power and Associates. “Based on J.D. Power’s 2011 Credit Card Satisfaction Study, cardholder satisfaction increases by 98 index points (on a 1,000-point scale) when service alerts are offered and used. Email (80%) is the most common form of service alert, and is followed by phone calls (23%); text messages (15%); and secure online messages (8%). Interestingly, secure online messaging is the lowest-used service alert feature, but it results in the highest satisfaction (783). While issuers still have to do a better job of informing their customers about the availability of the service, it’s clear that customers are seeking ongoing and proactive communication from their banks. Informing customers of status issues and concerns in real time, via text, email or secure online, is an emerging service that will likely grow exponentially in the year ahead.” *see Chart 2 below

What do you think 2012 will bring for the banking and financial services industries? Leave us a comment below or Tweet @bankingdotcom.

*Chart 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© 2011 J.D. Power and Associates Retail Banking Satisfaction Study, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

*Chart 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© 2011 J.D. Power and Associates Credit Card Satisfaction Study, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Reputation is the New Marketing Currency for FIs

The growth and convergence of the Internet, social media, and mobile technologies have created a disruptive shift in how businesses and their customers interact. Social media and other online connective technologies provide customers and prospects with an instantaneous, information rich platform for researching, discussing and buying everything from books to buildings.

This ability to access and share information has greatly increased pricing, product and corporate transparency, shifting market power from producers to consumers. It has also reduced the effectiveness of many of the traditional outbound marketing, communications and sales methods used by financial institutions.

The recent Banking.com post, Social Media Statistics: By-the-Numbers, May 2011, illustrates the size, scope and growing role of social media. Examples of some of key statistics included in the article are:

• 800,000,000 recommendations (aka ‘stumbles’) are made each month on news discovery service StumbleUpon

• 132,500,000 people in the US will log in to Facebook regularly this year; by 2013 that number will increase to 152.1 million

• 6 years of video is uploaded to YouTube every day

This massive increase in information, connectivity and transparency results in a greater role for corporate reputation in the purchase decision making process for both consumers and businesses. Because of this, financial institutions will need to build and manage their social reputations by actively participating in social media, delivering on commitments, building strong business relationships and providing value to their customers.

For more on this topic, please see the Intuit 2020 Report – The Future of Financial Services.

 

About Steve King:  Steve is a Partner at Emergent Research. His current research and consulting is focused on economic decentralization, the growth of small business and the future of work and workplaces. Steve has extensive consulting, marketing and general management experience with both large and small companies.  Steve is a senior fellow and board member at the Society For New Communications Research, a research affiliate at the Future of Work and an advisory board member at Pond Ventures.

About Carolyn Ockels:  Carolyn is the Managing Partner at Emergent Research.  Her current research and consulting is focused on economic decentralization, the growth of small business and Gen Y.  Carolyn has extensive consulting experience, and prior to Emergent Research managed Cambridge Energy Research’s Asian energy consulting business, led market research in Japan for RCM Capital Managment, and held a variety of domestic and international consulting positions with the economic forecasting and planning consulting firm Data Resources, Inc.

Intuit 2020: Future of Financial Services Twitter Town Hall

Last week, we posted a report compiled by Emergent Research and Intuit Financial Services which identifies and examines trends that will transform the financial services industry over the next decade. To accompany the release of the report, we’re hosting a Twitter Town Hall to discuss the findings and key trends that will shape the next decade of the banking industry.

We’d like to invite all our readers to tune into the conversation and participate:

What: Future of Financial Services Twitter Town Hall

When: Tuesday, April 19, 2011 at 1:00 pm PT/4:00 pm ET

Where: Go to www.tweetchat.com. Log in using your Twitter ID. Search for #b2020

Some topics the Town Hall will touch upon include the need for financial services to increase across all age groups and demographics; increased competition between financial institutions to serve small and mid-market businesses; cloud computing reshaping how value-added products and services are designed and delivered.

To download the full report, click here.

 

Infographic: The Future of Financial Services

Intuit 2020 Report: The Future of Financial Services

Today, Intuit released the latest edition of the Intuit 2020 report, Intuit 2020 Report: The Future of Financial Services, which identifies and examines four key trend areas that will  transform the financial services industry over the next decade.  These are:

1.  A New Playing Field for Financial Services: Regulatory pressures will increase and competition will grow from both traditional competitors and new entrants. These forces will lead financial institutions to explore new business models, collaboration and partnerships, and increased consolidation.

2.  Shifting Segments, Changing Markets: Consumer demand for financial services will increase across all age groups. The two largest contingents – aging baby boomers and GenYers – will demonstrate particularly acute shifts in their needs and types of products and services they purchase.

Competition to serve mid-market businesses will intensify, slimming financial institution margins.  However, the overall small business sector will continue expanding, with the total number of small and personal businesses increasing by more than 7 million over the next decade. Most of this growth will come from micro and personal businesses (less than $1 million in revenue) creating opportunities for financial institutions that can serve these firms efficiently.

3.  The New Customer Connection: Technology’s role in the customer experience will take center stage. With increased cost pressures and a growing demand for flexibility, accessibility and personalization, financial services organizations will accelerate their use of technology to meet customer needs.

Cloud computing platforms and applications will combine with advanced analytical tools, ever-larger data sets, and social and mobile computing to reshape the way the financial services industry designs and delivers value-added products and services to customers.

4.  Reputation and Relationships Rule: Institutions that use technology to serve up useful customer insights will win. Over the next decade, the financial service industry will shift its focus from transactions to customized value-added services.

Through a combination of both virtual and brick-and-mortar branches, banks will develop stronger, more personal relationships with businesses and consumers, helping them manage risk, build wealth, plan retirement and anticipate health care expenses.

Intuit 2020: The Future of Financial Services builds on the data, trends and forecasts in the Intuit 2020 report, which identifies 20 emerging trends and shifts that will shape business and society over the next decade.

As part of the research process, Intuit’s Financial Services division and Emergent Research conducted a series of interviews and forecast workshops with financial services professionals, academics, and industry analysts. These sessions helped identify the important trends and implications that will impact financial services over the next 10 years.

Click here to download the report.

About Steve King:  Steve is a Partner at Emergent Research. His current research and consulting is focused on economic decentralization, the growth of small business and the future of work and workplaces. Steve has extensive consulting, marketing and general management experience with both large and small companies.  Steve is a senior fellow and board member at the Society For New Communications Research, a research affiliate at the Future of Work and an advisory board member at Pond Ventures.

About Carolyn Ockels:  Carolyn is the Managing Partner at Emergent Research.  Her current research and consulting is focused on economic decentralization, the growth of small business and Gen Y.  Carolyn has extensive consulting experience, and prior to Emergent Research managed Cambridge Energy Research’s Asian energy consulting business, led market research in Japan for RCM Capital Managment, and held a variety of domestic and international consulting positions with the economic forecasting and planning consulting firm Data Resources, Inc.

A Look Into the Intuit 2020 Report: The Future of Financial Services

This report provides a view of the significant demographic, economic, social and technology trends and forces that will affect the financial services industry over the next decade.

The starting point for this forecast is the Intuit 2020 Report, released in October 2010, which identified 20 emerging trends and shifts that will shape business and society over the next decade.

To prepare this follow-up report, Intuit Financial Services and Emergent Research conducted a series of forecast workshops, exercises, and interviews with accounting professionals, academics, and industry analysts. These sessions identified the important trends and implications that will affect the financial services industry.

Check back on Monday, April 11th for more details and follow us @bankingdotcom and @financeworks.