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/   Insights

Question: Community branch, personal service, mobile banking—which is the odd one out? Answer: None. Otherwise, the industry is in trouble. For some time now, there have been discussions about the future of community banks...

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/   Spotlight

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Fast Facts: Student Loans

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/   Insights

The Financial Services Roundtable recently released another iteration of its Fast Facts, reliable, bullet-point research about issues facing the financial services industry. Topics span TARP, Dodd-Frank, insurance, lending, retirement savings and more.  Below are some updated Fast...

Intuit 2020 Report: The Future of Financial Services

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/   Insights

Today, Intuit released the latest edition of the Intuit 2020 report, Intuit 2020 Report: The Future of Financial Services, which identifies and examines four key trend areas that will  transform the financial services industry...

Small Business: Perception vs. Reality

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/   Insights

In the most recent election cycle, like most others before it, the one sector of the economy that got the most attention was small business.  This is the future, we were told by every...

The Top 10 Trends in the Digital Banking Industry

December 18, 2013
/   Spotlight

2014 is rapidly approaching and as the year wraps, the Digital Insight team has pulled together the top 10 trends in the digital banking industry based on data and trends from studying financial institutions....

Mobile Banking Engagement: Data from Digital Insight

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/   Spotlight

Intuit Financial Services has been conducting a comprehensive and ongoing study of financial institution customers. From these studies, the company has been able to provide a deeper view of banking customer behavior across several...

Financial Literacy Month: How are you celebrating?

March 22, 2013
/   Insights

With April approaching, it’s almost time to kick off Financial Literacy Month! Strongly supported by the United States Congress and the Financial Literacy and Education Commission, Financial Literacy Month aims to promote the importance...

For the majority of businesses, IT is a DIY proposition – do it yourself. That’s because most businesses are small businesses, which makes information technology decision-making at the Mom and Pop shops a DIY affair, far different than their larger business counterparts, where procurement is a managed process.

While the mechanics of technology decision-making for SMBs differ from those at large enterprises, their early embrace of the “Bring Your Own Device,” aka BYOD, strategy has lessons for the industry as a whole.

Try replacing a small business employee’s iPhone with a business-friendly BlackBerry and see how far you get. Chances are employees are using their own phones on the job. This consumerization of IT, in which consumers bring their own devices to work, is increasingly the rule at SMBs, not the exception.

This raises many questions for employers.

  • How can I connect these devices to existing services, including email and payment processing?
  • How can I protect against loss or theft?
  • How do I make sure company data doesn’t leave if the employee finds a new job?

The costs associated with these questions sound extreme, but the benefits of a BYOD strategy will, in most cases, more than offset the costs. Not surprisingly, when employees use devices they like and have chosen for themselves, they’re happier.

And there are hard savings as well. By putting employees in charge of their technology, a BYOD strategy also shifts the responsibility for managing and maintaining – and in some cases, purchasing – that device to the user, reducing the overall company’s technology costs. The small business that lets its people use their iPhones is the small business that doesn’t have to buy them corporate devices.

Aside from the discussion of benefits and downsides, a bigger question remains: Why is BYOD so popular?

The answer lies in a simple but infrequently acknowledged truth: Most business technologies deployed to users aren’t designed for users. They’re designed instead for buyers, whose agenda is far different than their individual employees. For decades, enterprise technology vendors courted CIOs, IT managers and other buyers with promises to make their life easier: automate deployment, ease the pains of management, and lock down individual devices so that users required permission to install even a new browser. The user experience, the interface’s aesthetics and any functionality not directly related to the business were afterthoughts, if they were thought of at all.

And then everything changed.

Five years ago this past January, Steve Jobs unveiled the iPhone, forever transforming the way we communicate. For the first time, users had a device that was designed not for the employer and not for the carrier, but for no one other than the person using the device.

With its first mobile phone product, Apple not only leapfrogged every other device manufacturer on the planet, they completely reset users’ expectations. No longer would we have to settle for a device that was clumsy and awkward to use – which described virtually every device built for businesses. Users revolted and embraced, and today you see iPhones, iPads and dozens of other consumer-focused devices tacitly, even explicitly, supported within the enterprise.

For the businesses, then, the lesson is simple. Think carefully about who your customer is and who you’re building for. Because if you forget about the person who actually has to use your product, you can be sure that someone else won’t.

*This post originally appeared on the Intuit Network

About Stephen O’Grady:
Stephen O’Grady is an industry analyst and cofounder of RedMonk. He is based in Maine, a frequent traveler, ardent RedSox fan and focused on helping companies understand developers better and, in general, helping developers do what they do best. He is a paid contributor to the Intuit Network.


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James W. Gabberty

Gabberty is a professor of information systems at Pace University in New York City. An alumnus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and New York University Polytechnic Institute, he has served as an expert witness in telecommunication and information security at the federal and state levels and holds numerous certifications from SANS & ISACA.

Marisa Mann

Marisa Mann brings over 15 years of experience in consulting and financial services industries to the Solstice team, working on large scale enterprise initiatives across many technologies, including specializing in the digital space – Internet and mobile. Mann is passionate about mobile and the endless possibilities for the enterprise, delivering business value through strong brand recognition and driving to excellence in the consumer experience. Prior to Solstice, Mann worked at JP Morgan Chase, Diamond Management and Technology Consultants, Washington Mutual, Inc, and Accenture.

Zachary Ehrlich

25-year-old writer, and as a native San Franciscan, I am unreasonably loyal to Bank of America, if only for their superhero-like origin story, involving the 1906 earthquake and Italian fruit vendors.

Brad Strothkamp

http://www.forrester.com/rb/analyst/brad_strothkamp