This Week We’re Reading..

From Heartbleed to Heartburn

Briefcase with lock

Information security is a constant game of catch-up. We get new technology capabilities, the bad guys find new vulnerabilities. They devise new forms of malicious assault, we come up with new defensive strategies. And so it goes. We know it, they know it, everyone knows it.

Why, then, is the bug known as Heartbleed getting so much attention?

Sure, no disputes that it’s at least potentially a very big deal. But one week into the discovery, Google turns up more than 530 million hits on the subject. The Electronic Frontier Foundation, among others, has labeled it “catastrophic,” and some have gone so far is to describe it as the worst vulnerability to be identified since commercial traffic began on the Internet. Is it really that bad?

Hype aside, here’s what we do know. Over the years, the open source community—basically, thousands of

Heartbleed, the big bad bug in the room, takes advantage of a feature within OpenSSL known as heartbeat, and essentially steals the security certificates that verify a site’s and/or user’s authenticity. The bug has been present but quiet for the past two years, during which time it has potentially undermined security measures for password encryption in a range of environments, from search engine and social networking services to Android devices.developers not beholden to any corporation in particular—have worked together to create much of the software many of us use today. One such program that most people with a life actually know nothing about is OpenSSL, which is very important, since it provides a means for security on web servers all over the world. With this technology, sites can offer encrypted information to visitors, ensuring that the data can’t be seen anyone else when it travels between the user’s device and a particular site.

After that the details get more technical and, sadly, far more murky. On the one hand, we’re being told that despite considerable scrambling on the part of security specialists at companies everywhere, the potential for major damage is very real. It potentially affects hundreds of thousands of Web sites, from Google and Yahoo to Twitter and Dropbox, along with hundreds of millions of users. By that measure, the level of effort needed to truly fix the problem is nothing short of monumental. On the other hand, it’s far from clear just how many sites or users have actually been affected. Challenges issued by security companies to steal information using the vulnerability—basically crowdsourcing digital theft—have so far come up mercifully short, indicating that the concerns, while valid, could be overblown. On the third hand, of course, we just don’t know.

One thing is certain: The old adage about regularly changing passwords, and not using the same one for multiple functions and services, applies now more than ever. The buzz over this recent episode has apparently prompted many users to rapidly change their passwords for all the online services and devices they use, and that’s good. But it would be even better if that became a habit rather than a reaction to much-publicized fears.

There’s a larger question here as well. The ubiquity of technology in every aspect of daily life, from social media to mobile banking apps, has perhaps seduced consumer sensitivity to the issue of information security. And that’s definitely not good.

Making technology capabilities ever more user-friendly carries with it a potentially steep price tag; the easier a service is for everyone to use, the easier it might be for the bad guys for to hack. On a related note, many of the more common services, from email to mobile apps, are free. That carries with it fewer guarantees of rock-solid security.

Many financial technology vendors are already stepping into to the breach to implement fixes for the Heartbleed bug. For their part, numerous commercial banks and other financial services institutions are raising awareness of the threat and running tests to ensure that their communities are not left unprotected.

But somewhere in this environment, consumers have a critical role to play too. Regularly changing passwords is a good start. As digital currency in all forms becomes more embedded in the mainstream, it would be wise to be more aware of security threats and more proactive in taking security precautions.

What We’re Reading: Retail Banking, Square, Voice Biometrics

Below are interesting stories the Banking.com staff has been reading over the past week. What have you been reading? Let us know in the comments section below or Tweet @bankingdotcom.

  •  What’s Behind the Mobile Banking Boom (video)

American Banker

Mobile banking has expanded beyond the market for youthful early adopters and is rapidly becoming a mainstream product. American Banker reporters discuss who else is logging on and the hurdles the industry faces to keep the momentum going.

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  • Report: IT Spending in Retail Banking Will Reach $152.5 Billion By 2018

Bank Systems & Technology

Back-end investment for compliance and investment in digital channels will drive strong growth in IT spending among North American banks, according to Ovum. Retail banks will grow their IT spending to $152.2 billion by 2018 in response to rising customer expectations and investment in digital channels, a recent report by analyst firm Ovum predicted.

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  • Navy Federal Promotes Square For Small Business Payments

Credit Union Journal

Mobile payments provider Square could get a big boost from the nation’s biggest credit union. Navy FCU is promoting Square’s mobile card reader and payment processing services to its small-business members. The $56 billion credit union’s website now hosts a page that allows members to sign up for Square. By partnering with Square, Navy Federal is providing members with an easier way to accept credit card purchases and track their sales, according to Jim Salmon, vice president of business services at Navy Federal.

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  • Banking Insider: U.S. Bank tests voice biometrics to replace passwords

Las Vegas Review Journal

U.S. Bank is joining a short list of large financial institutions that are testing voice biometrics as a potential replacement for the traditional password. That list includes Wells Fargo & Co. and Barclays Plc. Voice biometrics software users log in to an application or website by speaking a word or phrase. The word or phrase is compared to a previous recording the customer has made to verify it’s the same user. U.S. Bank employees are piloting the software and using a simple passphrase such as “my voice is my password” to access credit card account balances, search transactions and make payments on accounts using a mobile device.

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  • Why There Is No Amazon Of Banking

Snarketing 2.0

There are no Amazon-branded products or services. As a result, there are no Amazon product managers with a vested interest in selling their product over some other brand. Can you walk into a Citibank branch and open up a JPMorganChase checking account? Nope. Can you go to the Bank of America web site and apply for a Wells Fargo mortgage? Nope.  But you can go to Amazon’s web site and buy just about anything that anybody else sells.

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  • Here’s the One Stat Big Bank CEOs Are Freaking Out About

TIME.com

A new survey shows that nearly a third of consumers haven’t actually set foot in a bank branch in six months, and one expert predicts that number could rise to 50% in just five years. According to Bankrate.com, 30% of respondents to a new survey haven’t gone to a bank branch in six months. And more than two-thirds of those — 21% of respondents — haven’t set foot in a bank in the past year or more.

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Regulation and Resolution: The Future of Banking?

Banker signing paper

From this side of the Atlantic, the European Union (EU) can seem like a weird thing—most of us aren’t exactly sure when it started, how far it stretches or even what it exactly is. What we do know is that it’s a case study in constant evolution: It dates back to at least the ’50s, when six nations formed the European Coal and Steel Community and, later, the European Economic Community. However, the current European Union actually takes its name and primary structure from the Maastricht Treaty of 1993. The monetary union, the source of the Euro, was born in 1999; the constitutional basis for the EU, the Treaty of Lisbon, arrived 10 years later; and countries are still joining (Croatia became a member only last year).

Of course, as a unified entity, the EU still seems a little bit strange. But the potential for superpower status is clearly there, which may be one reason why it was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2012.

And then we get to March 2014. That’s when, after protracted negotiations, the last piece of the puzzle fell into place for an all-purpose European banking authority that will, at least by design, be better equipped to handle industry crashes, especially the kind that might have a domino effect. Most importantly, the entity has the regulatory authority to restructure, sell off or even shut down failing banks.

The move is a direct response to recent disasters that had catastrophic consequences for many institutions. Even entire nations have been similarly affected, most famously when a series bank failures and attempted bailouts virtually bankrupted Ireland and sparked major scandals. And whenever this happened, of course, other organizations and governments had to step into the breach, forcing taxpayers in one country to pay for the mistakes of financial services corporations in others.


To its credit, the new entity is designed to look forward rather than just back. The European Central Bank (ECB) has already been doing due diligence on larger financial services institutions to look for potential minefields. It won’t be a huge surprise if it does find problems. Meanwhile, the Resolution Board, as it’s called, has a two-pronged mandate.

First, it takes the power of supervision away from local regulators, who might be too close to the corporations they’re supposed to be monitoring. (They might also turn a blind eye to avoid making national institutions look bad.)  More important, perhaps, is the other function, which entails setting up a fund that is empowered to take essentially unilateral action on lenders that are deemed to be in trouble. In these instances, the fund can order a restructuring, sale or even shutdown (in some cases there will be other steps necessary). The fund will have in its coffers $76 billion to conduct these rescues as needed, with the money to be raised through levies on the industry.

The intent, of course, is to protect taxpayers from having to foot the bill for bad decisions made by bank executives. It should also help send a message of stability to financial markets everywhere. These are laudable goals, surely, but will it work?

To be clear, the Resolution Board doesn’t even exist yet. It won’t launch until next year, and contributions to the fund will start the year after that. There are also objections being raised to the effect that the agreement doesn’t go far enough. Some argue that in order to be truly effective, the new entity should be completely independent, rather than tied to an industry authority like the ECB, which has its own connections to national interests. But for those who want strong regulation, it’s clearly a start.

That brings us back to these shores. As we all remember from recent history, the United States has had its share of crashing banks, taxpayer-funded bailouts and accusations of lax regulation. Is there anything for us to learn from what the European Union is doing?

 

What We’re Reading: Omnichannel Banking, Bank Branches, Apple

Below are interesting stories the Banking.com staff has been reading over the past week. What have you been reading? Let us know in the comments section below or Tweet @bankingdotcom.

  • UMB Emulates Apple in Push to Encourage Mobile, Online Use

American Banker

UMB Bank is channeling its inner Apple to encourage more of its customers to use online and mobile banking. The Kansas City, Mo., bank has begun designating tech support specialists in its branches whose job is to help customers understand and use digital services like mobile deposits and online bill pay.

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  • Omnichannel Banking: More Than a Buzzword

Bank Marketing Strategy

Banks are in an unequalled position to understand their customers. They already can see product use, transaction patterns and demographic profiles. By leveraging channel usage insight, they can develop an even more detailed customer profile. Understanding not only what the customer looks like, but also how they conduct their banking can allow for improved product offers using their preferred channel.

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  • Regions, Credit Unions and USAA Sit Atop Customer Experience Rankings

Bank Systems & Technology

The banking and credit card issuer industries both saw significant improvements over last year in the Temkin customer experience ratings. Regions and credit unions earned the highest customer experience scores among banks in the 2014 Temkin Experience Ratings, released earlier today. Regions and credit unions tied with scores of 81%, followed closely by USAA and TD with scores of 80%, and USAA also earned the highest score among credit card issuers with 77%. Overall both the banking and credit card issuing industries improved their scores over last year.

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  • BBVA creates digital banking unit

Finextra

Spain’s Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria has established a digital banking unit in a bid to boost the development of its various technology-led businesses. The new business area is charged with leading the bank’s digital transformation around the world, running its multi-channel strategy and the design of operational and commercial processes.  It will also work on developing new business lines, overseeing internal developments such as the Wizzo app as well as the bank’s startup investments made through its $100 million venture fund and Simple, the US firm it bought for $117 million last month.

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  • It’s Not Easy for Banks to Sell You on New Services

The Street

Banks spend tons of money figuring out how you like to spend and save money, especially when it comes to using credit cards and mobile banking, two huge profit center for financial institutions. The credit card industry will process about $4 trillion in card transactions this year, according to Business Insider, and Albany, N.Y.-based ResearchMoz reports that mobile banking is also flexing its muscles, growing from 480 million U.S. users at the end of 2012 to 1.08 billion by 2016.

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  • One in Three of Americans Hasn’t Been to the Bank in at Least 6 Months

WSJ Blog

More than a third of people in the U.S. haven’t been to the bank in at least a half of a year, according to a new survey.  People with lower incomes and less education visit bank and credit union branches less often, the Bankrate.com survey found. For example, 35% of people with at least some college education visited a bank in the last week, compared with 21% of people with at most a high-school education.

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Tax Time & Financial Institutions: Data from Digital Insight

The tax filing deadline is rapidly approaching, and for many consumers that means looking through last year’s financial records for various items like charitable contributions or tax deductions. Digital Insight, which offers TurboTax ® for Online Banking to its financial institution (FI) customers, took a deep dive into how consumers are using tax software and how it can benefit FI’s. Through tax exit studies and surveys, Digital Insight was able to see how the tax preparation software helps FI’s with customer engagement and retention. Below are key findings from the study, and you can view a more in-depth analysis here.

And, you can view previous Digital Insight studies on mobile banking behavior and online banking. 

Intuit, TurboTax and TurboTax Online, among others, are registered trademarks and/or service marks of Intuit Inc. in the United States and other countries. Other parties’ trademarks or service marks are the property of their respective owners.

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What We’re Reading: Branches, Mobile Going Mainstream, Banking Alerts

Below are interesting stories the Banking.com staff has been reading over the past week. What have you been reading? Let us know in the comments section below or Tweet @bankingdotcom.

  • Tech-Savvy Bankers Make the Case for Branches

American Banker

Bank branches may be falling out of favor, but even the most tech-savvy bankers aren’t prepared to renounce them entirely. Take Manolo Sanchez, the chief executive of BBVA Compass, whose bank is spending $117 million to buy the branch-less online startup Simple. You might expect him to declare brick-and-mortar bank locations passé — and yet his company just opened two new branches last week. That’s because customers still want to see branches — even if they don’t go in, and even if they do most of their banking on the computer, the tablet or the mobile phone. Just seeing a physical bank location actually increases a person’s interest in doing business with BBVA Compassonline, he says.

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  • Mobile is Now Mainstream: Report

Bank Systems & Technology 

Mobile banking features play an increasingly critical role in the consumer’s decision to switch primary banks, according to a survey from AlixPartners. Mobile now plays a crucial role in bank-switching decisions made by consumers, according to a new report from AlixPartners.  According to the “AlixPartners Mobile Financial Services Tracking Study,” 60 percent of smartphone or tablet owners who switched primary banks reported mobile banking capabilities as “important” or “extremely important” in their decision to switch, up from 48 percent in a similar survey in the first half of 2013.

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  • Apples and Payments

Celent Banking Blog

What is becoming apparent is that the update is not without its flaws, to say the least. My iPhone, for example, lost half its charge in under an hour, doing nothing. Whilst battery life has never been the iPhones strong point, this was taking the biscuit! Twitter and internet forums have seen significant amounts of discussion on the issues, and it seems to be impacting a large number of people. What was noticeable is that most of the fixes transformed the iPhone to, well, just a phone. Suggestions included turning off apps, turning off search, deleting various elements – in short, many of the reasons why we bought iPhones originally.

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  • Banks buying more time for Windows XP-powered ATMs

Dallas Business Journal

Earlier this year, we told you about the impending problems that many banks might face as Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT) ends its support for Windows XP on April 8. Roughly 95 percent of the nation’s ATMs operate on the aging system, and many banks now are having to buy extended support contracts with Microsoft as they try to convert the machines to a new operating system. JPMorgan Chase (NYSE: JPM) , for example, has bought a one-year extended life support for its Windows XP machines, CNN/Monday reported. In January, Chase told the DBJ earlier that it was working to upgrade its machines as part of normal operations.

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  • Amazon Tests the Loyalty of Its Prime Members With a 25% Price Hike

Javelin Strategy & Research Blog

After 9 years, Amazon has finally decided to increase the price of its Prime membership – and it’s not an insignificant amount. The cost of Amazon Prime will increase on April 17, 2014 by a hefty $20 (from $79 to $99), and the Prime membership will continue to include free two-day shipping, access to Prime Instant Video, and the Kindle Owner’s Lending Library. The Amazon Prime membership is undoubtedly one of the best online loyalty programs available today, and so this significant price change will likely be a true test of just how much consumers are willing to pay for the perks of free shipping and digital perks.

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  • Monitise launches Alerting+ for interactive m-banking

Mobile Payments Today

Mobile banking technology provider Monitise has launched Alerting+, an alerting solution which enables two-way interaction between financial institutions and their mobile banking customers.

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  • Mobile Banking: Critical Switching Trigger Today… Table Stakes Tomorrow

The Financial Brand

Mobile continues to play an increasing critical role in bank-switching decisions, with 60% of smartphone and tablet users citing mobile banking capabilities as “important” or “extremely important” in their decision to switch banks. According to the “Mobile Financial Services Tracking Study” from AlixPartners, 60% of smartphone or tablet owners who switched primary banks in the fourth quarter said that mobile banking capabilities were an “important” or “extremely important” component in their decision to switch. That’s up dramatically from 48% in a similar survey fielded in the first half of 2013.

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FI Spotlight: Arizona Federal Credit Union

AZFCU-Logo

In our latest FI Spotlight we spoke with Aaron Oplinger, Senior Director of eServices & Channel Integration at Arizona Federal Credit Union. Aaron shared AFCU’s recent initiatives with us and discussed how they are better serving their members.

Q: In a few sentences, can you tell us about recent initiatives at Arizona Federal Credit Union? 

In January 2013, Arizona Federal Credit Union redesigned itself internally and externally in support of its mission statement, “to develop and serve an empowered membership through the delivery of financial services and expertise, producing mutually beneficial results.” This included a redesign of our staffing model and physical locations, driving active use of self-service products, reinforcing membership benefits and increasing member participation.

Aaron Oplinger headshot March 2014Q: How did redesigning your staffing model impact the relationship between staff and members?

Our staffing model was changed from a teller/personal banker model to a combined role so that any person within a branch could assist a member with any financial need. The physical branches are also being remodeled to create a more open space that eliminates barriers between staff and members, such as greeting stations, teller lines, etc. Additionally, staff at remodeled locations use wireless tablet PCs that are fully functional with the credit union’s core processor, creating a shoulder to shoulder conversation with members versus being behind a desk or counter.

Q: Specifically, how did you increase the active use of self-service products?

We’ve pre-loaded iPads in every location with our apps as well as 40-50 financial education apps, such as mortgage and loan calculators, auto and home research, valuation and repair apps, gas price apps and more.

Q: How have you found the response amongst your members so far? 

Our members are increasingly becoming familiar and comfortable with our apps.  And, they are also receiving additional value from the financial education tools we provide, supporting our mission statement of providing financial expertise. Early data indicates that the first remodeled branch has the highest penetration rate for both acceptance and usage for Mobile Remote Deposit Capture.

Q: Can you tell us more about your membership rewards? 

As an industry first, Arizona Federal Credit Union began charging $3 each month for membership dues. The dues have shown an increased use of services and we were able to give back $8 million to members from December 2012 through December 2013, with the average actively participating member receiving more than $50, well beyond the $36 per year that is paid.

Want to hear more from Arizona Federal? Like them on Facebook.

Think your FI deserves special recognition? Submit your FI here.

Bribery, Corruption, Money Laundering: Banks in the Crosshairs, Part 2

This is Part 2 of a two-part series from FTI Consulting. Read the first part here.

Governments and regulatory bodies increasingly expect financial institutions to man the front lines in the war against international corruption and bribery, levying significant fines against banks that have been used by criminals or have conducted business with sanctioned regimes. To survive in this environment, firms must up their game by implementing risk-based controls to account for both front-end client acquisition and back-end transaction risks.

This effort must be led from the top. Senior management must set the tone and be fully engaged in building the internal controls that can make their organizations less vulnerable both to missteps and the depredations of criminals.

However, given the complexities of global finance, and the cunning of criminals, these defenses need to be risk-based, with the institution’s finite resources devoted appropriately to businesses and jurisdictions with inherently higher risk profiles or weaker control environments.

Mitigating client risk
Client-onboarding rules and processes more be made rigorous before accounts are activated. This requires assessments that can indentify:

  • Politically exposed persons.
  • People with criminal backgrounds or connections.
  • People conducting business in sketchy jurisdictions and geographies.
  • Individuals acting as proxies for hidden players.

Criminals are continually changing their strategies, using opaque structures to hide the true sources and destinations of funds. It is therefore critical to employ experienced investigators to establish the identities of high-risk individuals and entities, especially when they come from countries where this data is difficult to verify.

Mitigating transaction risk
Banks should deploy technologies to filter suspicious transactions. There is a vast array of commercially available tools that can flag unacceptable transactions (such as identifying sanctioned country codes on transfer receipts). They can trigger alerts and automate watch lists for suspicious persons and transactions, and can also produce reports that are critical when an institution finds itself in the regulator’s crosshairs. But all these tools are only as good as the people who use them. Firms must acquire skilled staff to fine-tune the systems as well as to assess and act upon the alerts and reports they produce.

Taking these actions is a statement of good faith. Using up-to-date processes and tools, and staffing the risk-management function as diligently as possible will make regulators less inclined to punish firms that make the occasional, unavoidable mistake.

It’s Never That Simple
Because it’s nearly impossible to define the scope of the problem – that is, how much money is being laundered or moved around the globe by criminals and terrorists – it is hard for institutions to measure the effectiveness of their programs or assign an ROI to their investments. Consequently, they should be measured by what doesn’t happen – fines, reputational damage, remediation costs, and lost business – not what does.

Ultimately, it is unrealistic to think that the financial industry can take on the bad guys by itself. One hopes that the future will bring greater levels of cooperation between governments and the financial sector. Ultimately, that’s the only way to de-fund criminal interests, terrorists, and others who would seek to sabotage the world’s financial system and use it to further their own anti-social ends.

 

Peter Brooke and Christine Moran are Managing Directors in the Governance, Risk and Regulation team at FTI Consulting, based in London.

Peter Brooke is an experienced Risk and Regulation Consultant at FTI Consulting, based in London. With a unique blend of in-house and consulting experience, Mr Brooke has worked in financial services for more than 24 years.

As a highly experienced Group Head of Compliance, Christine Moran is an energetic consultant at FTI Consulting. Based in London, Ms. Moran has a highly collaborative, grounded and commercial approach. She has a proven track record of building enhanced and effective compliance and regulatory risk arrangements in both retail and institutional businesses.

What We’re Reading: Retail Banking Myths, Security, ChaseNet

Below are interesting stories the Banking.com staff has been reading over the past week. What have you been reading? Let us know in the comments section below or Tweet @bankingdotcom.

  • 43 retail banking myths—busted!

ABA Banking Journal

With the financial services industry changing so quickly, it should come as no surprise that many assumptions banks and credit unions believed to be true for years could actually be rendered obsolete.  Myth 1. Banks must embrace big data to be successful. Reality: Most banks and credit unions have not fully leveraged insight that is currently available within their firewalls. Account ownership, demographics, product use, and other behavior data should be used for offers and communication before adding unstructured data from outside the organization.

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  • Holidays Drove High Use of Mobile Banking Apps

American Banker

December was a busy month for mobile banking, as on-the-go holiday shoppers actively logged into their accounts to check balances or see if purchases went through. In American Banker’s monthly survey of mobile banking activity, more than 65% of respondents said that volume was up in December from a month earlier, while just 2% said activity declined. The rest reported that activity was roughly the same month to month. Several respondents attributed higher activity to the fact that their mobile banking app is relatively new.

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  • Mobile Banking: Making Security and Convenience a Package Deal

Bank Systems & Technology

The key to mobile security success is a multi-layered approach that enables companies to verify who their customers are and what they are authorized to do. The clash between convenience and security has been in motion as the world has shifted to mobile devices, but this is only the beginning. While highly-connected companies have been managing these challenges for years, the speed, scale, and scope of the ongoing business transformation are enormous.

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  • Chase’s Quick Checkout: Leveraging the Power of ChaseNet

Celent Banking Blog

A digital wallet, which stores customer’s payment credentials and shipping details, and pre-fills them at checkout. Like other digital wallets, Quick Checkout is “open” – i.e. customers can register their non-Chase cards. However, their Chase cards will be automatically available and kept up-to-date in the wallet when they get replaced in case they expire or get lost or stolen.

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  • Capital One Ups the Punching Power of ClearXchange

Javelin Strategy & Research Blog

Person to person (P2P) payments are quickly becoming a regular feature of today’s banking industry. ClearXchange, the P2P payment platform that developed as a partnership between Bank of America, Chase, and Wells Fargo, has announced that it has added Capital One to its list of owners. Capital One is the second FI to join clearXchange (the first institution was the regional FI FirstBank) and is scheduled to go live with the service later in 2014. According to Javelin data, the addition of Capital One now gives clearXchange the capacity to reach 40% of all U.S. banking adults and 53% of all adult credit cardholders.

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  • It’s Time to Uncork Commercial Relationship Revenue

Gonzo Banker

There is a brutal feeding frenzy occurring in the banking industry today: the complete commoditization of mainstream commercial and commercial real estate lending. Like a pack of vultures picking at the flesh of a potential new mini-perm deal or term loan, liquidity-rich banks are feverishly bidding down pricing into the zone of shareholder destruction. We see fixed-rate deals for 7 to 15 year terms that carry coupons lower than many banks’ net interest margins. Despite calls for sanity from every senior loan committee across the country, the brinksmanship continues. Business customers have grown savvy, and even the most loyal now send their credit needs out onto the street for competitive RFP bids. Loyalty these days seems to buy about 10 basis points for the banker.

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  • Banking Trojans emerge as dominant mobile malware threat

ZDNet

Kaspersky Lab’s latest mobile threat landscape report portends more ominous news for mobile device users as the number of new malicious programs tailored for smartphones and tablets more than doubled to nearly 100,000 malicious modifications in 2013. The vast majority of the most damaging mobile malware targeted users’ money and bank cards, according to the security software firm’s latest data, and more than 2,500 attempted infections by banking Trojans were blocked last year alone.

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