Social Media Statistics: By-the-Numbers, May 2013

Below are some interesting statistics on social media usage. Feel free to share your favorite social media statistics in the comments section or Tweet @bankingdotcom.

  • 500,000,000: The number of photos uploaded and shared per day in 2013. (Source: KPCB)
  • 442,000,000: The number of views per month generated by the top 500 brands on YouTube. (Source: Outrigger Media)
  • 50,000,000: The number of unique visitors per month to the Foursquare website. (Source: Foursquare)
  • 6,000,000,000: Hours of YouTube video watched per month. (Source: YouTube)
  • 5: The number of Vine videos shared every second on Twitter. (Source: Unruly)
  • 24: The percentage of online teens that use Twitter, up from 16 percent in 2011. (Source: Pew Internet)
  • 150: The number of times the typical smart phone user checks their phone per day. (Source: KPCB)
  • 645,000,000: Views of local business Facebook Pages during an average week. (Source: Facebook)

Does your financial institution use Pinterest? Here are three creative ways brands are utilizing the site from Social Media Examiner.

Social Media Chatter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image courtesy of nattavut / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Social Media Statistics: By-the-Numbers, March 2013

Below are some interesting statistics on social media usage. Feel free to share your favorite social media statistics in the comments section or Tweet @bankingdotcom.

  • 100,000,000: The number of active monthly users for photo-sharing service Instagram as of February 2013. (Source: Instagram)
  • 8,900,000: The number of Tweets sent on Sunday, February 24th about the 85th Academy Awards. (Source: Twitter)
  • 64: The percentage of US advertisers that plan to increase their social media ad spend in 2013. (Source: Digiday)
  • 200,000,000: Dollars in new funding for social scrapbooking site Pinterest. (Source: AllThingsD)
  • 180,000,000: The number of U.S. Internet users that watched online content videos in January 2013. (Source: comScore)
  • 36.2: Billion online content videos watched by U.S. Internet users in January 2013. (Source: comScore)
  • 191,400,000: The number of unique US visitors for Google in December 2012, making it the most visited site in the US during the month. (Source: comScore)
  • 200,000: Dollars per day to purchase a Promoted Trend on Twitter according to recent reports. (Source: AllThingsD)

Worried about having your Twitter account hacked? Here are five reminders for brands from Social Media Today.

Social Media World

Image courtesy of bplanet / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Social Media Regulation – Part I: Adapting to New Policies

This is Part I of a two part post on American Banker’s “Banking Regulatory Update: New Social Media Rules” webinar. You can view Part II here.

Last week, the Banking.com team sat in on American Banker’s webinar, “Banking Regulatory Update: New Social Media Rules,” which detailed the current policies around social media use by financial institutions. Moderated by American Banker’s own Penny Crosman, the panel of presenters included:

With content ranging from how to establish a corporate social media policy, general best practices for social media, and analyzing the FFIEC guidance  and call for feedback on social media regulation, we wanted to take a deeper dive on the content and connect with some of the experts ourselves. We first spoke with webinar moderator, Penny Crosman, editor in chief of Bank Technology News and technology editor of American Banker.

 

Q: What social media policies have you seen banks and credit unions using that you think are effective?

Most of the social media policies I know of are dry, legalistic, and boilerplate. The policies drafted by large banks and Wall Street firms seem to be draconian – many don’t allow employees to even access social media sites (except for a few people who work in customer service and marketing). One reason for this is SEC rules that require banks to archive all emails – messages stored on social networks are difficult for a bank to monitor and store. The employees of these companies sometimes use their personal smartphones and tablets to access the sites. I know of Wall Street executives who have Twitter streams under aliases and protect their streams from being viewed by any but their close friends. Commonwealth Bank of Australia last year came out with a harsh policy that insisted that employees report “inappropriate or disparaging content and information stored or posted by others (including non-employees) in the social media environment” or risk being fired. These are examples of going overboard. Banks and credit unions need to find a way to comply with the necessary rules, yet encourage natural, positive engagement on social media. Citi, for one is finding success using software to identify and catch potential rule violations and route those to its legal group, while encouraging its customer services people to maintain friendly and helpful conversations with customers on Twitter and Facebook. I think more banks will turn to software to handle policy compliance, rather than expecting employees to keep all the rules in their heads.

Q: Do you think banks and credit unions are quickly learning how to adapt to these regulations?

Banks and their compliance departments are keeping a close eye on these regulations and are sure to have their own policies in place when the FFIEC publishes its final rules. They are already used to complying with the many existing consumer protection laws the FFIEC cites in its guidance. What some of them may end up doing is freezing all social media activity until they get their policies finalized and employee training conducted.

Q: What would you recommend as the first step for banks to develop social media policies and practices?

I think the logical first step would be to canvass all current social media activity – review all social media pages the bank maintains and ask employees what they’re doing on their own. The second step would be to hire or consult with a good lawyer who can parse out which aspects of the rules apply to the bank’s activities and help create a policy that would enable compliance.

Q: How do you think upcoming Facebook payments capabilities will affect banks’ interactions with social networks?

I think banks may eventually get involved with payments over social networks, but they may be the last to the party, largely because of the regulations they need to be careful of, such as the Electronic Funds Transfer Act. There are also security issues with social media payments, as social passwords are pretty easy to game. Authentication will be tricky and important. I expect banks will be very cautious about this.

 

Interested in hearing more? Check out Part II with our interview with Carl Pry, Senior Director, Treliant Risk Advisors who spoke to us about how he counsels financial institutions on their social media activities.

 

Social Media Regulation – Part II: Creating Your Social Media Policy

This is Part II of a two part post on American Banker’s “Banking Regulatory Update: New Social Media Rules” webinar. You can view Part I here.

Last week, the Banking.com team sat in on American Banker’s webinar, “Banking Regulatory Update: New Social Media Rules,” which detailed the current policies around social media use by financial institutions. Moderated by American Banker’s own Penny Crosman, the panel of presenters included:

Much of the content of the webinar dissected the implications of the FFIEC’s proposed guidance and how financial institutions can comply. As regulators are looking for feedback on the guidelines by March 23, we spoke to Carl Pry, Senior Director, Treliant Risk Advisors, to hear how FIs are currently reacting to the guidance.

 

Q: What have you seen as the number one risk management issue for financial institutions on social? Can you elaborate on a way to avoid this situation?

The most critical risk management issue for banks regarding social media is the lack of awareness and oversight. Many institutions are taking a wait-and-see approach when it comes to social media, to their detriment. Institutions that don’t address this issue in the present are missing an opportunity to connect with a demographic we all want to reach: the young and technologically capable. But the risk comes when taking a hands-off approach results in the illusion that the institution is simply not participating in social media. Chances are that you are – your employees are – using social media every day. Without a clear social media policy and procedures, without guidelines on what can and cannot be said, you may be violating certain laws and regulations without even knowing it.

Avoiding this situation means getting ahead of the curve by formulating and implementing clear company-wide policies and procedures addressing social media. They should be comprehensive and deal with both company and employee usage of social media. Also, set clear guidelines for consumers and your customers who utilized your bank’s social media sites, as well.

Q: Do you think banks and credit unions should use Twitter and Facebook as customer service channels at all? Why?

Absolutely, although within limits. These are channels your customers are already using in their everyday lives, so why ignore them? They have the advantage of providing more immediate responses than snail mail, that’s for sure. But be aware of the limitations of social media, such as the 140-character limit of Twitter. Can you say what you want to say within 140 characters? For customer service usage, also understand what different social media sites do. You might not want to broadcast specific responses to the masses. Know the way these channels operate and coordinate your responses accordingly.

Q: Do you have any tips for HR policies or training for employees using social media?

Most importantly, make clear to employees what the parameters of usage are. Not how much time they spend on social media, but content of postings. If an employee is posting anything on behalf of the bank, make sure it is subject to the same control and review mechanisms you’d employ for any other sort of communication (such as email). But also be clear as to the expectations of employees posting things on their own accounts regarding their employment or the institution’s products and services. They should know the limits of what not to say, and that if they discuss the bank’s business, all appropriate legal and compliance requirements likely apply.

 

To hear more, check out Part I and our interview with Penny Crosman, editor in chief of Bank Technology News and technology editor of American Banker who shared her thoughts on banks adapting to new guidelines and regulation.

 

Anti-Social Media Hacks

Burger King and Jeep have nothing to do with financial services. But both banking professionals and the customers they serve would be wise to keep a close eye on the fast-food retailer and the automaker as they seek to recover from high-profile hacks this week. It could just be a sign of things to come.

As has been widely reported, both companies this week had their Twitter accounts hacked and, in different ways, defaced. There’s already been wide speculation regarding the perpetrators, but at this point that’s almost less important than the fact that the hacks occurred at all. The primary motive seems to have been to cause mischief, but most such intrusions have a more malevolent intent.

The news of these high-profile Twitter hacks comes shortly after the granddaddy of social media, Facebook, revealed that it was the victim of a “a sophisticated attack. . .that occurred when a handful of employees visited a mobile developer website that was compromised.” Facebook didn’t identify the developer site in question, though it has been identified named elsewhere.

So what does all this have to do with banking?

The reality is that this where many aspects of the financial services industry are headed. And unlike fast food or even cars, this is a practice fundamentally built around private information that needs to be kept secure. The most recent data breaches make it clear that we’re far from that level of security.

Most institutions are already active in the social media sphere, but the current initiatives mainly revolve around marketing and messaging. It seems only a matter of time before at least a few brave organizations make the leap into trying to develop Facebook into a transaction platform and transmit private information via channels such as Twitter.

In some ways, it’s a throwback to the early days of the Internet. The Credit Union National Association reports that a third of all credit unions now offer mobile banking, and all of the rest will have joined the fray within the next two years. That’s nearly twice the adoption rate for online banking when it arrived, which means that we’re already entering the second generation of mobile banking capabilities.

When social media is thrown into the mix, as seems almost inevitable, the growth rate will likely be even more accelerated—there’s an entire generation primed to enter the workforce that has a problem remembering a time before these technologies were fully integrated into every aspect of daily life.

The question is not whether social media channels need to become more secure; the focus should be on how to make them more secure, and who should lead the effort. We already have best practices in place for consumers, but it’s fair to think few will heed the advice. It’s up to us.

There’s no single constituency that can do everything related to security. The banks, the social media providers, the government, commercial and technology vendors—everyone must be involved. We need expert working groups, industry standards and new technologies. And we need them now.

Social Media Statistics: By-the-Numbers, January 2013

Below are some interesting statistics on social media usage. Feel free to share your favorite social media statistics in the comments section or Tweet @bankingdotcom.

  • 200,000,000 – The number of members for professional social network LinkedIn, an increase of 13 million since November 1, 2012. (Source: LinkedIn)
  • 181,000 – The number of Twitter users with “social media” as part of their bio as of January 2013, up from just 16,000 in 2009. (Source: AdAge)
  • 2 – The number of people that join LinkedIn every second, which equates to more than 172,000 new members per day. (Source: LinkedIn)
  • 92 – The percentage of people who share mobile video they have watched on their phone with others. (Source: IAB)
  • 200,000,000 – The number of monthly active Twitter users. (Source: Twitter)
  • 87 – The percentage of US magazine and newspaper publishers that have an iPad app. (Source: Alliance for Audited Media)
  • 33 – The percentage of US Internet users who said they ended a connection with a brand on social media due to the brand sharing too many updates. (Source: eMarketer)
  • 1 Million – The number of websites that have integrated with Facebook (Source: iStrategyLabs)

Did you catch the analysis of the most loved and most hated brands of 2012? Social Media Explorer has the breakdown.

Social Media BandwagonPhoto credit: Matt Hamm / Foter.com / CC BY-NC

Social Media Statistics: By-the-Numbers, November 2012

Below are some interesting statistics on social media usage. Feel free to share your favorite social media statistics in the comments section or Tweet @bankingdotcom.

  • 31,000,000: The total number of Tweets sent on Election Day 2012. (Source: Twitter)
  • 40: The percentage of time spent on Facebook’s newsfeed; only 12 percent of time is spent on profile and brand pages. (Source: comScore)
  • 4,000,000,000: The number of stories that have been read on the Pulse mobile platform since it launched in May 2010. (Source: Pulse)
  • 3,000,000: The number of tweets published along with #sandy and/or #hurricanesandy during the first 24 hours of the storm making landfall on the East Coast. (Source: Topsy)
  • 604,000,000: The number of monthly mobile users for Facebook in September 2012.  (Source: Facebook)
  • 175,000: The number of new LinkedIn profiles created each day as of September 2012. (Source: LinkedIn)
  • 584,000,000: The number of active daily users on average for Facebook in September 2012. (Source: Facebook)

LinkedIn introduced Thought Leader pages in October. Curious who the most followed thought leaders are? Read LinkedIn’s blog here.

Intuit Financial Services’ Innovation Conference: Mobile Trends, Technology Transformation, and Personal & Small Business Finances

In early October, Intuit Financial Services hosted its annual user conference, the Intuit Innovation Conference, in Nashville, Tenn. The conference brought together industry leaders from banks and credit unions across the country, and discussed key topics affecting the financial services industry. To provide a broad spectrum on issues, Intuit hosted an array of esteemed keynote speakers included Steve Forbes, Chairman, CEO, and Editor in Chief at Forbes Media; Tom Kelley, General Manager of IDEO; and, Dan Ariely, behavioral economist and author.

The Banking.com staff got a chance to pull key tidbits from the event, which focused on mobile trends, technology transformation, and personal and small business finances. Below are some top tweets and highlights from the conference:

Mobile:

  • Tablet users touch their financial institution (FI) 30 times per month across multiple devices (tablet, phone and PC) not including text banking touches.
  • Smart phone remote deposit users deposit approximately 2+ checks per month at an average of more than $420 per deposit. Cost savings to FI – $3 each deposit over using a branch.
  • 30% of customers now factor mobile solutions into why they choose their primary FI.
  • Average mobile phone user now spends 12 minutes/day on the actual “phone,” two hours/day doing other things.
  • Mobile is the primary way people interact with their FIs today and growing; mobile banking up 63% to 57 million in 2011.
  • 10% of online banking users are now using their tablet.

Technology Transformation:

  • Web and mobile is eliminating intermediaries like traditional editorial process. Media model of last 150 years has been blasted away.
  • Mobile is changing the media model again. Everything in marketing must be customized to the individual. There are more specialized segments than ever before.
  • Contingent workforce will be 40% in few years (following passions, seeking work/life balance). This offers a new set of financial complexities that financial institutions will need to consider.
  • Digital trends shaping future behavior:
    • World without borders
    • Participatory networks
    • Mobile first & only
    • Humanizing the data
    • Reputation rules
  • “The Digital channel has increased engagement 3x to 32 times/month” – Intuit Financial Services General Manager, CeCe Morken

Personal & Small Business:

  • 2/3 of personal businesses don’t track their mileage for tax time or they track it incorrectly.
  • 50% of small businesses use manual methods (pen paper) to manage finances.
  • Average value of personal business to an FI is $5,000 in revenue per year. Consumer value is $500.
  • Personal small business market segment is growing. Forecast is 32 million by 2018.
  • Personal businesses take longer to make buying decisions than consumers and larger businesses.
  • “74% of #smallbiz owners aren’t wowed by their FI”-Christine Barry of @AiteGroup

A recurring theme of the conference was mobile in the banking industry; how important is a mobile presence to you? Does your FI meet your needs with its mobile solutions? What do you expect from your FI’s when dealing with mobile? Leave us a comment below.

Satisfaction With Social Media Interaction

Guest post by Karen Licker, Social Banker & Content Contributor (Independent) at J.D. Power and Associates

Social media, a non-traditional method of customer interaction is clearly becoming increasingly important for banks to understand.

It’s no longer just a vehicle for customers to vent about poor experiences, praise their bank for exceeding expectations, or read about other customers’ positive or negative experiences—it has now become a legitimate service channel!

Social media sites not only allow customers to interact with their bank, but also provide another medium to converse with representatives, get questions answered, and resolve problems. For example, data from our 2012 J.D. Power and Associates US Credit Card Customer Satisfaction Study shows that during the past 12 months, 5% of credit card customers have contacted their issuer through their social media site to ask a question, resolve a problem, or make a request.

Although many questions or problems may need to be handled outside of the social media site that was the initial contact, it is important for banks to show they are listening to their customers’ “pain points” by providing an actual response to the social media posting.

Did you know that only 60% of customers who contacted their credit card issuer via social media received a reply?

Needles to say, the impact of replying to a posting on overall satisfaction is profound, as Interaction satisfaction among customers who have received a reply to their social media contact is notably higher than among those who did not receive a reply (802 vs. 748, respectively). Findings from our recent study also revealed that optimizing customer satisfaction with their social media experience does not end at merely responding to the request, but that issuers should continue to focus on the following:

  • Resolving the initial issue at hand
  • Offering additional assistance
  • Thanking the customer for their business

When each of these best practices are met, Interaction satisfaction increases to 839, which is 91 points higher than when they are not met.

Source: J.D. Power and Associates 2012 US Credit Card Satisfaction StudySM    

The Bottom Line:
With the continued advancement of technology shifting the way customers interact with financial institutions, it is vital for banks to proactively respond to the changing demands of their self-service channels and understand the importance of being responsive to feedback posted on social media sites.

 

Social Media Statistics: By-the-Numbers, September 2012

Below are some interesting statistics on social media usage. Feel free to share your favorite social media statistics in the comments section or Tweet @bankingdotcom.

  • 20: The percentage of US newspapers that now have online paywalls, twice the number that did one year ago. (Source: News & Tech)
  • 139: The number of Fortune 500 companies with a public-facing corporate blog in 2012, a five percent increase from 2011. (Source: UMass)
  • 24: The percentage of U.S.-based small businesses who claim to currently use social media in a “strategic and structured way.” (Source: eMarketer)
  • 63: The percentage of Pinterest users that are age 35 or older. (Source: Pingdom)
  • 129.7 million dollars in projected US mobile advertising revenue for Twitter in 2012. (Source eMarketer)
  • 235,000,000: The number of people who play games on Facebook each month. (Source: Facebook)
  • 65: The percentage of U.S. grocery retail executives who said they plan to use social media tools like Facebook and Twitter as part of their marketing arsenal within the next five years. (Source: eMarketer)

It’s no secret that smartphone growth is growing rapidly, but a Nielsen snapshot shows that teens and young adults lead growth in smartphone adoption. Read more here.