Tax Refunds: Are you helping your customers spend it wisely?

Piggy Bank

Now that Tax Day is upon us and refunds are trickling in, your customers and members are being provided with new funds. But whether they spend, invest or save, are you guiding them to make the wisest decision?

Christopher McGill, president and CEO of East River Bank  in Philadelphia, PA has a few recommendations for his customers on how to use their refund dollars.

While the smartest decision is to obviously pay off a prior debt or invest that refund, spending – even just a portion of it – on a smart purchase is actually advisable, according to Christopher.

Rule of Thirds

Christopher always recommends the “rule of thirds” when upon receiving an unexpected amount of income. Divide the refund into thirds and put one portion towards a credit card bill or other debt, another third into savings and investment, such as an IRA and the final amount towards something for you.

Save More Money

However, instead of spending it on something frivolous like a trendy handbag or new set of golf clubs, consider splurging on a purchase that could actually save you money over time. Examples include an espresso maker (much cheaper than a daily trip to Starbucks), a bicycle (a healthier and more affordable means of transportation) or a high efficiency appliance, which can help you save loads on energy costs.

Invest in Yourself

Another smart splurge is investing in your career by furthering your education. Use part of your refund to take some continuing studies courses to sharpen your skills and better your chances for that promotion and, hopefully, salary increase.

Spend Selflessly

Finally, for the most selfless purchase of all, consider this the time to get some life insurance. If you have a spouse or children who depend on your income, invest in their financial security and your own peace of mind. While it might seem depressing, spending a few hundred dollars a year to create an insurance protection fund for your family is something definitely worth considering.

What advice are you giving your customers and members?

 

Monetizing the Mobile Channel – Webinar

*Disclosure: Banking.com is powered by Digital Insight

The mobile channel is no longer optional for banks and credit unions. But for those financial institutions already deploying mobile solutions, how do they optimize profit and benefit to the customer?

On  Wednesday, April 23rd, Digital Insight will host a free webinar,  ”Monetizing the Mobile Channel,” as part of their 2014 Momentum Webinar Series.

Digital Insight Mobile Webinar

The webinar will include insights on optimizing the benefit of your mobile channel and help you:

  • Learn about key trends driving mobile innovation and their potential to solve real problems for your users while driving revenue.
  • Rethink potential disruptors to your business with a new collaborative approach.
  • Understand how traditional channel profitability analysis may limit your perspective and therefore your outcomes.

Does your mobile spending embrace change with a laser focus on ROI? Join Digital Insight as we kickoff our  and take a dive into the future of the mobile channel as a profit engine.

We’ll be attending, following along and sharing insights via Twitter with the hashtag #DIMobile.

You can register for the webinar by clicking the image above. See you there!

Party Time at the Branch

This post originally appeared as a Banking.com guest post on Sageworks’ Blog.

Source: TampaBayNewswire.com

Source: TampaBayNewswire.com

Everyone in our industry acknowledges banks need to be different, and we’ve explored numerous initiatives on Banking.com, from video transactions to teller pods and community rooms.  But how about serving up a cocktail with your account statement?

That’s one way to look at St. Petersburg, Fla.-based C1 Bank’s new branch in Miami’s Wynwood district. Sure, it’s got all the amenities every branch needs, but be prepared for the teller desk to become a bar, and a fully stocked kitchen ready to accommodate a sizeable party of movers and shakers. In fact, the location actually doubles as an event space.

The trendy art on the walls is kind of a giveaway too, as is the custom, rounded table near the entrance and safe-deposit boxes behind moveable bookshelves. It takes virtually no time for the entire setup to be transformed into a party room. And when the party’s over, a laser light show continues.

The investors say it’s a new kind of bank that’s designed for entrepreneurs by entrepreneurs. For the record, C1 Bank was recently named one of the five local companies to watch in 2014. The branch has also been the area’s first full-service provider for more than 20 years.

It’s easy to wish the establishment luck while privately seeing it as a novelty, but there’s another aspect that demands attention. Many banking industry analysts stress that in order to survive, new branches must reflect and serve their neighborhood’s tastes and needs, as this one surely does.

In the last few years, the Wynwood area in Miami has seen more than its share of ups and downs. However, like many urban areas, it has recently undergone major shifts leading to greater investment, and of course gentrification. What might have once been described as urban blight—personified by abandoned warehouses and buildings occupied by squatters—has been replaced by trendy cafes and art galleries. The textiles industry has been supplemented with fashion outlets.

In that sense, the new branch fits right in. It serves its purpose as a bank branch in the traditional sense, but it does more. And that might be the key to future success.

There’s no doubt that bank branches everywhere have been hit hard by changes in the business environment. Just recently, Minnesota-based TCF Bank announced that it isclosing eight branches in the Twin Cities area, all within the Cub Foods chain. The parent company closed many more late last year in the Chicago market.

The troubles confronting bank branches represent just one aspect—though a painfully visible one—of the many changes rocking the industry. The debate on what comes next continues to rage. There are even discussions on the nature and scope of the problem, let alone the solution. And it’s a good discussion to have.

Source: CommunityNewspapers.com

Source: CommunityNewspapers.com

In the meantime, however, innovations are surely welcome. Turning a sober financial services establishment into an event space with martinis and DJs probably isn’t for everyone. But every branch should probably be asking itself not only what kind of banking services it can provide to better serve the community, but what else it can do as well.

We live in a world of instant gratification, an international outlook and unprecedented mobile capabilities that radically alter consumer behavior. Having with a solid, dependable presence in the community and offering great customer service with a personal touch used to be enough. But in this business environment, at this time, we need to do more.

Top 5 Mobile Missed Opportunities that Cost Financial Institutions Money

In recent years, the proliferation of smart phones, tablets and web-enabled mobile devices has spurred nearly every financial institution to scramble and put together a mobile banking option for their consumers. It’s not just the growth of these technologies that is driving demand, it’s the users themselves.  Mobile users have been found to access their financial information 64 percent more frequently than non-mobile users.  As these consumers become increasingly more dependent on these devices, financial institutions are realizing that the first-generation mobile banking offerings are not sufficiently supporting the demand for anytime, anywhere banking needs, or giving financial institutions the ability to integrate all product and service offerings.  At what point did the existing mobile banking experience become obsolete?

It is time to start thinking bigger.  Financial institutions of all sizes must evolve their mobile strategy from a simple transaction only application – to a platform that allows your financial institution to offer all products and services via the mobile channel. In fact, it is projected that mobile banking will reach nearly 46 percent of all U.S. bank account holders by 2017.  To stay competitive, financial institutions must embrace mobile technologies to deliver a consumer experience that is both competitive and world class.  This will help mitigate the risk of losing customers in the coming years by supporting the consumer’s needs while simultaneously promoting products and services.  It is time to think in terms of a strategic channel that serves a virtual presence for a growing percentage of financial consumers.

Throughout our years of experience in the industry we’ve witnessed some of the nation’s largest financial institutions miss significant growth opportunities by not expanding their mobile strategies.  To help, we’ve compiled a list of the top five missed opportunities that are costing financial institutions growth and profit:

Top 5 Mobile Missed Opportunities:

  1. A mobile strategy is not just an app:  A good mobile strategy includes all the services consumers want and need – not just transactional banking. The strategy needs to consider how the app can be used to boost revenue, provide best-in-class customer service, as well as attract new consumers while maintaining and engaging existing users.
  2. Like a traditional branch – the user experience matters: Focus on this experience.  Users find it frustrating to continually enter log-in information for every mobile application an institution offers tarnishing the experience.  A positive user experience will quickly drive product adoption and usage, saving the institution tremendous amounts of time and money.  For example, a typical institution should experience an average savings of $4.15 in processing costs for every check that is deposited through their mobile platform versus a brick and mortar branch.  The app must also be fully customized and branded to align with strategic marketing guidelines.  It should provide the highest level of consumer self-service and provide answers to questions 24/7 to enhance the value of the mobile platform.
  3. One’s enough!:  One app creates a unified mobile presence.   Multiple apps lower adoption and confuse consumers.  The results are poor ROI and consumer adoption.  Give your consumers access to all product and service offerings in one downloadable app.
  4. Make the data work for you: Tracking app downloads just isn’t enough these days.  Your organization is missing out on valuable intelligence about how your consumers are interacting with your app.  Take advantage of analytic tools tied to your platform to learn about user preferences, engagement stats and true ROI data.
  5. Not monetizing the mobile presence:  Beyond simple banking transactions, the mobile app needs to provide opportunities to engage and serve the consumer.  The mobile app should promote products and enhance revenue opportunities through a great user experience, while also maximizing channel efficiency and lowering operating expenses for the institution.  ROI is created by offering products and services like loan applications, knowledge base  answers to questions with strong calls to action,  and new account openings to name a few.

For a growing number of consumers, the mobile experience is the only interaction they have with your financial institution. By avoiding these 5 missed opportunities you will develop a mobile strategy that encompasses all aspects of your business – from attracting new revenue and promoting products, to providing superior self-service. Done right, your mobile strategy and presentation should both increase productivity, revenue and profitability.

 

Amber Robinson is the Director of Marketing at SilverCloud, Inc.

Dan Chaney is the CEO of FI-Mobile.

 

Bridging the Generation Gap

Kids today—they don’t know much, but they think they know everything.

That’s the familiar yet only appropriate reaction to the latest deep dive into millennial behavior as it pertains to banking. This one comes from “The Millennial | Financial Behaviors & Needs,” a comprehensive new study commissioned by TD Bank and conducted by Angus Reid Public Opinion. The study samples 2,031 millennials aged 18-34, all of whom have some form of financial relationships.

In what might not be a big surprise, a significant majority of the respondents, 69%, have never taken part in any financial courses, seminars or workshops. But apparently that isn’t a big problem—fully 59% of those surveyed say they’re extremely, very or somewhat knowledgeable about day-to-day banking. And here’s a nugget that will confirm some more stereotypes about this generation.  When they actually do go search for information, nearly half cite parental influence for their opinions in this area, and 40% turn to family for specific advice. Of course, a strong 62% also go online to find answers.

To be sure, none of the findings in the TD Bank is particularly surprising. They do more banking online than in-branch; nearly half favor mobile access, and the numbers keep rising; and so on. Each generation carries with it a level of stereotypes, and this one is no exception. And of course, as with most stereotypes, there is more complexity than is first apparent, and that emerges with more detailed research.

It’s easy to shrug off these studies, but to do that would be a mistake. Negative perceptions aside, millennials do bring real change. And for our industry to survive, let alone thrive, we must do things very differently.

Millennials are the reason why a retail giant like Costco is facing some very real problems. The company is still frequently celebrated in customer service surveys and documentaries alike, but concerns are rising that the membership and bulk-goods business models don’t appeal to younger consumers. That may be one reason why the stock is suffering.

Costco is facing issues in generating and retaining millenial-aged members.

On a related note (since the Costco model is so dependent on customers having cars), the auto industry—which is still in recovery mode after a rough few years and government bailouts for some—is getting worried that those pesky millennials don’t seem to want cars as much as their predecessors did? Is it because, in this economic climate, they just can’t afford to buy what they want? The car makers certainly hope so, but the fact that an alarming number of teenagers haven’t even bothered get a driving license should be cause for concern. Is it because the wealth of social media tools and channels make it less necessary to meet face to face? Is it because in the age of Big Data, these tech-savvy and privileged consumers won’t respond to marketing unless it’s much more customized?

And as even a scan of the headlines will make clear, millennials are the reason why President Obama appeared on a far-outside-the-mainstream outlet like “Between Two Ferns” to pitch his signature legislation, the healthcare law. Critics have savaged the appearance as being beneath the office of the President, but the undeniable truth is that the stunt generated enormous attention and drove unprecedented traffic to the primary healthcare site.

In a sense, we’re not that different from giant retailers, carmakers and the Presidency. We need to get our message out there in order for our customers to come to us. We don’t have to change our identity or our philosophy in the process, just certain strategies and a lot of tactics. But the bottom line is that in appealing to millennials, if we’re not doing things differently, we’re probably doing things wrong.

 

 

FI Spotlight: Arizona Federal Credit Union

AZFCU-Logo

In our latest FI Spotlight we spoke with Aaron Oplinger, Senior Director of eServices & Channel Integration at Arizona Federal Credit Union. Aaron shared AFCU’s recent initiatives with us and discussed how they are better serving their members.

Q: In a few sentences, can you tell us about recent initiatives at Arizona Federal Credit Union? 

In January 2013, Arizona Federal Credit Union redesigned itself internally and externally in support of its mission statement, “to develop and serve an empowered membership through the delivery of financial services and expertise, producing mutually beneficial results.” This included a redesign of our staffing model and physical locations, driving active use of self-service products, reinforcing membership benefits and increasing member participation.

Aaron Oplinger headshot March 2014Q: How did redesigning your staffing model impact the relationship between staff and members?

Our staffing model was changed from a teller/personal banker model to a combined role so that any person within a branch could assist a member with any financial need. The physical branches are also being remodeled to create a more open space that eliminates barriers between staff and members, such as greeting stations, teller lines, etc. Additionally, staff at remodeled locations use wireless tablet PCs that are fully functional with the credit union’s core processor, creating a shoulder to shoulder conversation with members versus being behind a desk or counter.

Q: Specifically, how did you increase the active use of self-service products?

We’ve pre-loaded iPads in every location with our apps as well as 40-50 financial education apps, such as mortgage and loan calculators, auto and home research, valuation and repair apps, gas price apps and more.

Q: How have you found the response amongst your members so far? 

Our members are increasingly becoming familiar and comfortable with our apps.  And, they are also receiving additional value from the financial education tools we provide, supporting our mission statement of providing financial expertise. Early data indicates that the first remodeled branch has the highest penetration rate for both acceptance and usage for Mobile Remote Deposit Capture.

Q: Can you tell us more about your membership rewards? 

As an industry first, Arizona Federal Credit Union began charging $3 each month for membership dues. The dues have shown an increased use of services and we were able to give back $8 million to members from December 2012 through December 2013, with the average actively participating member receiving more than $50, well beyond the $36 per year that is paid.

Want to hear more from Arizona Federal? Like them on Facebook.

Think your FI deserves special recognition? Submit your FI here.

Bribery, Corruption, Money Laundering: Banks in the Crosshairs, Part 1

Contributor Christine Moran

Contributor Christine Moran

This is Part 1 of a two-part series from FTI Consulting. Read the first part here.

The volume and pace of transactions in global financial markets – magnified and accelerated by new technologies – is mind-boggling. It has been estimated, for example, that every day there is $2.9 trillion worth of stocks, bonds and derivatives traded in U.S. financial markets.   It’s easy to see how this makes monitoring both client onboarding and financial transactions monumentally difficult.

For instance, in recent months an internal Vatican Bank investigation found that it had not been adequately vetting account holders, allowing criminals to launder money and transfer large sums via proxies. Last summer, German regulatory agency BaFin found Deutche Bank, with over €2 trillion in assets, laggard in reporting suspicious transactions to police due to inadequate internal controls.

Governments and regulatory bodies are well aware of the difficulty of policing transactional activity, as well as violations of international sanctions against countries with ties to terrorism, or with poor human rights records. Understaffed and underfunded, these bodies would like to shift their burden to the financial institutions, seeing that as the only way to keep ill-gotten money out of the financial system and to de-fund criminals and terrorists. And they are driving this agenda with a flurry of fines.

Contributor Peter Brooke

Contributor Peter Brooke

U.S. enforcement authorities, flexing their regulatory muscles, recently have imposed fines for sanctions breaches on Lloyds Banking Group ($350 million), Barclays ($298 million), and Standard Chartered ($327 million).  In the UK, the Financial Services Authority imposed a fine of £5.6 million on RBS for similar transgressions.

The U.S. Department of Justice and the Securities Exchange Commission are using the Bank Secrecy and Foreign Corrupt Practices acts to demand greater due diligence from all parties involved in transactions, holding them responsible for both sins of commission (such as facilitating money laundering or committing sanctions breaches) and omission (failing to implement sufficiently strong internal controls against either or both). In short, governments are making it clear that they will not tolerate what they deem to be reckless conduct on the part of financial institutions, or what they see as a weak commitment to abiding by international rules regarding sanctions and money laundering.

Financial institutions argue that the expectation that they can act as a branch of law enforcement is unreasonable. They cannot, they say, monitor every transaction or client with 100 percent certainty or make their businesses risk-free. They say the investment they must make in people, processes and technology to attempt to comply with regulations and avoid being implicated in financial crime places a massive strain on their resources. And, they point out, there is a limited pool of experienced people they can draw upon to lead, manage and run anti-money laundering and sanctions compliance programs.

In this debate, financial institutions are bound to lose. They have no choice but to get smarter about both client and transactional risk, and do more about them.

This will require top-level leadership, and a risk-based approach to mitigating financial and transactional risk. In part two of this article, we will discuss how financial institutions can do this.

 

Peter Brooke and Christine Moran are Managing Directors in the Governance, Risk and Regulation team at FTI Consulting, based in London.

Peter Brooke is an experienced Risk and Regulation Consultant at FTI Consulting, based in London. With a unique blend of in-house and consulting experience, Mr Brooke has worked in financial services for more than 24 years.

As a highly experienced Group Head of Compliance, Christine Moran is an energetic consultant at FTI Consulting. Based in London, Ms. Moran has a highly collaborative, grounded and commercial approach. She has a proven track record of building enhanced and effective compliance and regulatory risk arrangements in both retail and institutional businesses.

How Do You Rate?: Q&A with VERIBANC President

Mike Heller Veribanc

We recently spoke with VERIBANC, a company that provides bank ratings on all U.S. federally insured financial institutions. Michael Heller, president of the company, told Banking.com about what the VERIBANC does and who they work with.

 

Q: Can you tell us more about VERIBANC?

A: We’ve been in business since 1981 and our bank rating system has helped banks, consumers, business people and government offices manage banking risk and protect their deposits and investments against bank failure and fraud.

Q: How do you develop your bank ratings?

A: The ratings are developed using our existing ‘Beyond CAMELS’ quantitative only methodology. This methodology has been audited and approved by several insurance companies for use with insuring deposits in excess of the FDIC’s limit. No bank or holding company has ever paid us to rate them. We have always published our track record (ratings effectiveness) and not just a few of the good years.

Q: What does your track record look like?

A: We don’t claim to be perfect, just optimally tuned. Our current ratings effectiveness rate is over 99 percent, while our false alarm rate is about 20 percent. Our rating system is unique in that we do not “conservatively adjust” our criteria so that a large part (30 percent or higher) of the banking industry winds up in our lower rating categories – so as to improve or inflate our predictive results. Instead we balance predictability of bank failure with false alarms, so we can provide our customers with true value. We even publish our track record on our website at: http://www.veribanc.com/TrackRecord.php.

Q: What products do you offer to help Banks and Credit Unions meet regulatory standards?

A: Our most popular report for banks is our Regulation F Report. Comparable to this for Credit Unions is our Section 703 Due Diligence Report.

Q: You released your Q4 ratings at the end of 2013. Can you share an excerpt with us?

A: Our Director of Modeling at VERIBANC, Milton Joseph, wrote the following on “Size Equals Strength”

The FDIC’s recently released September 2013 (Quarterly Banking Profile) reveals an overall sound condition and continued financial improvement among the nation’s Insured commercial and savings banks. For the quarter, the sector achieved a nearly 1.0% return on average assets, and, as of September 30th, the industry’s Leverage (Core Capital) Ratio reached 9.4%. Nonperforming Assets-to-Assets fell to 1.8% at that date. At mid-year, comparable percentages were 9.3% and 1.9%, respectively.

Our asset size review indicates that small banks and thrifts, those with assets of less than $100 million, demonstrated particular strength. As of September 30th, that category of institution reported a Leverage Ratio of 11.7% and a Loss Reserve-to-Noncurrent Loan Ratio of 87.4%. Both percentage were the highest among any of the measured asset-size peer groups.

Interestingly, at September 30th, deposits held by FDIC-Insured institutions exceeded $11.0 trillion. Included in that total were deposits of close to $1.6 trillion that were higher than the FDIC’s $250 thousand Insurance limit. Nearly all of the $1.6 trillion of Un-Insured deposits (91.6%) were held at large institutions with total assets greater than $10 billion. One might conclude that size does continue to equate to strength 

 

To learn more you can go to www.veribanc.com.

Top 5 Online Banks on MyBankTracker: Winter 2014

This article originally appeared on MyBankTracker.com.

As MyBankTracker has grown over the past few years, our focus on banking has never wavered, as we have tracked 6,927 FDIC insured banks and compiled useful information for consumers to make smart banking decisions. We currently have just over 8,600 bank reviews from real bank customers for the purposes of building banking transparency.

Our criteria for picking the top rated online banks are based around report card ranking comprised of bank health, fees, technology, rates, location and mobile access. According to MyBankTracker’s reviewers, the top banks are: Ally Bank, Charles Schwab, USAA Bank, Capital One 360, and Bank of Internet.

*In determining which banks topped the list, we chose banks that each had at least 20 reviews.

 

1. Ally Bank 

ally-bank-logoAlly Bank ranked three out of five stars by reviewers, with a total of 417 reviews, an “A” grade, and an overall rating score of 83%.

Without branches, Ally is able to offer free ATM use on any machine by reimbursing customers for surcharges, and offers high yields and 24/7 customer service for checking and savings. Ally interest checking comes with no maintenance fee with higher than average interest rates — accruing 0.4% on up to $15,000 and 0.75% above that. Ally Online Savings is also free, and offers a competitive interest rate on all balances, coming in at a flat 0.84%.

2. Charles Schwab 

charles schwab logo

Charles Schwab Bank has been rated by our reviewers as three out of five stars with a total of 48 reviews, an “A” grade, and an overall rating score of 81%.

Besides checking and savings accounts, Charles Schwab offers a multitude of services, including help in saving for retirement, ways to invest, and trading tools. Consumers can stay connected by being able to talk with specialists, going online with mobile apps, and heading to workshops, such as free retirement workshops. Schwab’s High Yield Investor Savings comes with no account minimums, no monthly service fees, unlimited free rebates from any ATM worldwide, the ability to deposit checks from anywhere (Schwab Mobile Deposit) with an interest rate of 0.12%. The Schwab Bank High Yield Investor Checking Account gives customers 0.10% variable interest on any balance, and offers free bill pay, free standard checks, a Visa Platinum debit card, and a linked Schwab One brokerage account without fees or minimums.

 3. Bank of Internet

bank of internet logo

Bank of Internet has been rated three out of five stars with a total of 24 reviews, an “A” grade, and an overall rating score of 77%.

Bank of Internet is an online, branchless bank which offers high-interest checking, savings, certificates of deposit, and money market accounts. There are no overdraft fees and consumers receive things like ATM fee reimbursement, free online banking, free bill pay, mobile deposit and more. Bank of Internet’s homepage advertises rewards checking with the potential to earn up to 1.25% APY, 6 times the national average, as well as low interest rate mortgages.

 4. USAA Bank

usaa bank logo

USAA Bank has been rated three out of five stars by 220 reviewers, a “B” grade, and an overall rating score of 65%.

Established in 1983, USAA Federal Savings Bank provides a full range of financial products and services to the military community globally. USAA offers military members and their families investment products, checking and savings products, credit cards, and life insurance. Like the other banks on our list, USAA has free ATMs nationwide, and offers mobile and technological ways of accessing and managing your money, bills, spending, and budgeting. The bank advertises interest rates that are twice the U.S. average, but this does not compare to Bank of Internet’s APY of 6 times the average. Rates on USAA savings vary from 0.10% to 0.20%. USAA checking comes with an APY of 0.01%.

5. Capital One Bank

capital_one_bank_logo

Capital One Bank has been ranked two out five stars on average by 67 reviewers, but earns a “B” grade.

Capital One has some competitive features, such as no fees for opening an account and no monthly maintenance fees. They also have a savings APY of 0.85% for a minimum deposit of $100 and an APY of 0.90% for a minimum deposit of $25,000. Additionally, the bank offers many cards designed for business owners with varying features, APRs, and rewards.

 

As seen in our list of the top online banks, banking has become more competitive, with online banks now offering more lucrative features for consumers than traditional banks such as high-interest and free ATM use. The future of banking, we predict, will move even further in that direction, with banks continuing to move to the online sector and consumers growing disenchanted with the traditional approach to banking.

 

Are You Creating a Safer Internet for Your Members and Customers?

As more banking customers interact with their financial information online, it becomes ever more important that they know how to conduct themselves responsibly online.

Tomorrow, on Safer Internet Day, February 11th, ConnectSafely.org is asking Americans to spread an epidemic of kindness and share the #OneGoodThing  they’ve done, or seen somebody else do, to make the Internet a better place. Safer Internet Day (SID) is a global campaign to promote safe, effective use of the Internet and mobile technology. Hosted in the United States by ConnectSafely.org, Safer Internet Day is commemorated each year on the second Tuesday of February.

SID is a great opportunity to take the time and think about how you’re educating customers and members to be safe online, and reflect on the positive ways technology impacts the way we bank and interact with our finances.

Share your #OneGoodThing on Twitter, Facebook or submit here to spread kindness and celebrate the ways that the online world helps us every day so we can create a better internet together.

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